ADDENDA and CORRIGENDA
Additional information received since the publication of the book

Page x No 20, for 'Augusts' read 'Augustus'.

Page 16 Line 8, for 'son' read 'grandson'.

Page 22 - Thomas Dunckerley.

It appears that the name of Mary Dunckerley's husband was Adam, for Adam and Mary Dunkerley had a child, Edward Bolnest Dunkerley, born 10 February 1726 and baptised 24 February 1726, at St James, Westminster [BIVR from FHL MF 1042308]. He may be the Adam, son of Adam and Mary Dunkerley, born 7 April 1689 and baptised 17 April 1689, also at St James, Westminster.

Page 28 - Frederick, Prince of Wales (additional entry)

1728 Elizabeth Burr. Margaret Burr, who is said to have been born in 1728, married the artist Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) at the Mayfair Chapel, 15 July 1746. She received an annuity of £200 from the estate of the Duke of Beaufort and is thus generally credited with having been the Duke's daughter [ODNB, vol. 21 (2004) page 268]. In 1930 a portrait said to be of James Burr and the work of Thomas Gainsborough was sold from the collection of the sitter's great, great-grandson at Barbizon House, the sitter being described in the sale catalogue as a commercial traveller who worked in the establishment of Gainsborough's father, a milliner and crepe-maker at Sudbury, Suffolk, and the brother of Gainsborough's future wife. 

However, in research on Gainsborough's early life, it was suggested by Adrienne Corri in her The search for Gainsborough (London: Jonathan Cape, 1984) that the artist's wife Margaret was the daughter of Frederick, Prince of Wales [Corri, 153], a conclusion strengthened when she found mention in the Prince's circle at Kew of one John FitzFrederick Burr [Corri, 155].

I have not seen any evidence to substantiate any part of this theory. Margaret Burr is generally said to have been born in 1728 but Frederick, Prince of Wales, did not come to England until December 1728. There does not appear to be any contemporary evidence that she had a brother. The descendants of one Alexander Burr who had children (by a wife Jane Anderson) baptised at St Cuthbert's, Edinburgh between 1761 and 1769, have a pedigree [information kindly supplied by Dr J.B.L.Matthews, 2011] showing him as the son of James Burr (born 1710), the supposed sitter in the portrait, and showing James as the son of Daniel Burr and Elizabeth Daucherbs/Dancherts, who were naturalized in 1722/3, but I have not seen any evidence that there was such a person as James Burr with these relationships. Daniel and Elizabeth had no known child of that name and the parentage of Alexander Burr seems unknown. Without further evidence it seems possible that James Burr was invented to give a name to the portrait at its sale in 1930.

John FitzFrederick Burr was baptised at St John the Baptist, Croydon, Surrey, 2 July 1736, the son of Frederick and Catherine Burr [FHL MF 994,331], being the fourth of six children of the couple baptised there between 1732 and 1738. He was admitted a proctor in the Court of Arches in 1758 [Act Books of Archbishop of Canterbury, ix, 330, indexed in Harleian Society,vol. 55, page 124] and is presumably the John FitzFrederick Burr who married in 1761 [Faculty Office Marriage Licence] and whose will was proved in the PCC, 23 May 1764 [PROB11/898 folio 164]. His father, Frederick Burr, seems most likely to be the Frederick Burr, aged 14 when naturalized in 1722/3 [Huguenot Society,vol. 27 (1923) pages 124, 129], and baptised at the Oude Kerk (St Nicholas), Amsterdam, 14 September 1708, the son of the above mentioned Daniel and Elizabeth Burr [FHL MF 113136 & 113179].

Page 31 - Hon. Anne Vane.

The date of death of Anne Vane, as mentioned in my book, has been variously stated. The Gentleman's Magazine gives it as 27 March 1736 [GM 1736 168] but Collins [iv (1756)  307] and the later peerage writers show it as 11 March 1735/6 [e.g. BP (2003) sub Barnard of Barnard's Castle]. It would seem, however, that she actually died on Friday, 26 March 1736. The Grub Street Journal (Thursday, 1 April 1736) says that she died 'on Friday at Bath'. Read's Weekly Journal or British Gazetteer (Saturday, 3 April 1736) says that she died 'Friday 7-Night' and the Weekly Miscellany (Saturday, 3 April 1736) has 'March 26 At Bath'. According to the Daily Gazetteer (Friday, 2 April 1736) 'the Corpse of Hon. Mrs. Anne Vane is to be privately interred at Bath'.

Joseph Chester's authority for his statement that Anne's daughter Amelia (Vane) was born and baptised about midnight, 21-22 April 1733 [Chester (1876) 345], would seem to be the report in the London Evening Post (Saturday, 21 April 1733): "In the Night between Saturday and Sunday last the Hon. Mrs Anne -- was deliver'd of a Daughter at her house in Grosvenor Square, who died in two Hours, after having been batized in the Name of Amelia. Her Son, of which she was formerly deliver'd, is in very good Health". Other contemporary accounts, giving her name in full, say 'on Saturday night' (St James's Evening Post, Saturday 21 April 1733; Grub Street Journal, Thursday 26 April 1733). The latter is misleading as the previous Saturday is clearly intended. The correct date for Amelia's birth would thus seem to be 14/15 April 1733

Page 37 Line 3, for '180S' read '1805'.

Page 39 Line 38, for '182S' read '1825'.

Page 41 re Frederick Henry James Ritso

The St Marylebone, Middlesex, registers show the marriage by licence of Frederick Ritso, of this parish, bachelor, and Ellen Errington, of St George the Martyr, widow, on 20 October 1795 [Registers, Page 363, Entry 1089].

Page 43 re Frederick Charles Grimm Ritso

Frederick Charles Grimm Ritso, aged 57, widower, of 3 Bernard Street, son of John Ritso, deceased, Officer in the Army, married 2ndly, by banns at St George, Bloomsbury, 11 November 1880, Jane Hill Harris, 45, spinster, of 3 Bernard Street, daughter of Richard Stancombe Harris, deceased, farmer [Register, Page 6, Entry 11].

The St Pancras Old Church, Middlesex, rough burial registers show the burial of Frederick Ritso, of 3 Bernard Street, Bloomsbury, aged 78, on 19 June 1897 [Rough Book, Page 30].

Page 43 line 50, re Sophia Ritso

Sophia Ritso was buried, an infant, at Putney, Surrey, 3 September 1778 [Registers, Entry No 54].

Page 44 Line 30, re Daniel Prytherch

[I am indebted to Mr John Prytherch for the information that the marriage of Caroline Georgiana Catherine (Augusta) Dalton and Daniel Prytherch took place on 18 February 1826 at Llanllwch, Carmarthenshire]. Their children were:

1d.   Daniel Dalton Prytherch, born at Priory Street, Carmarthen, 13 May 1827 and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 21 June 18827 [BTs, Entry 259]. Admitted pensioner Trinity College, Cambridge, 13 June 1845; matric. Michaelmas, 1847; named in will of father, 1854. He died of consumption at Tenby, Pembrokeshire, 20 August 1857 [GM 1857 ii 468; GRO indexes].

2d.   Caroline 'Aylife' Harriot Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 9 November 1828 and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen,16 December 1828 [BTs, Entry 429]. Aged 12, 1841 ('Eylife') [Census]; at home, 1851 [Census]; executrix to father, 1855. She died unmarried  at Battersea, Surrey, 7 September 1871 [PPR Calendar], aged 42. Her administration as late of Carmarthen, granted 15 December 1887 [PPR, £195; resworn August 1891, £608-5-5].

3d.   Margaret Augusta Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 20 May 1830 and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 21 July 1830 [BTs, Entry 608]. She died 24 January 1839, aged 9 [BLG]; buried at St Peter, Carmarthen, 30 January 1839 [BTs, Entry 522].

4d.   Charlotte Augusta Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 29 August 1832 and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 20 March 1833 [BTs, Entry 907]. Aged 8, 1841 [Census]; scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; not named in will of father, 1854.

5d.   James Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 15 January 1834 and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 20 February 1834 [BTs, Entry 992]. Aged 7, 1841 [Census]; scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854; of 14 Upper Brunswick Street, Hackney, Middlesex,Member Royal College of Surgeons, 1871 [RG10/326-132-33]. He died at 14 Upper Brunswick Street, Hackney, Middlesex, 3 March 1872, aged 38 [PPR Calendar; GRO Indexes]. His administration granted 8 May 1888 [PPR, £195]. He had married Lucy Jane Pugh.  She was born 1837-8 [1871 Census]; of 4 Holly Villas, Clapton Square, Hackney, administratrix to husband, 1888. She died 1907 [information from Mr John Prytherch]. They had issue.

6d.   Frances ('Fanny') Sarah Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 13 April 1835 and baptised at St Peter Carmarthen, 15 May 1835 [BTs, Entry 1118]. Aged 6, 1841 [Census]; scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; executrix to father, 1855. A death in this name registered at Carmarthen, June Quarter 1855 [GRO Death Index].

7d.   Susan Catherine Dalton Prytherch, baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 2 May 1837 [BTs, Entry 1347]. Aged 4, 1841 [Census, 'Susannah']. She died 22 January 1846 [BLG]; buried at St Peter, Carmarthen, 27 January 1846 [BTs, Entry 994].

8d.   Augusta Octavia Dalton Prytherch, baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 25 February 1839 [BTs, Entry 1478]. Aged 2, 1841 [Census]; scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854. She died in Sculcoates RD, March Quarter 1869, aged 29 [GRO Death Index]. She had married in Carmarthen RD, June Quarter 1865, Revd. Maurice Edward Jenkins [GRO Marriage Index]. He was born 1840 and died 1916 [information from John Daniel Prytherch]. They had issue (with a daughter):

   1e.  Edward Lloyd Prytherch Jenkins, of Egton Vicarage, Grosmont, Yorkshire, gentleman, administrator to aunt Aylife Prytherch, 1887; to grandmother C.G.C. Prytherch, 1887; to grandfather Daniel Prytherch, 1888 [not there 1881 RG11/4832-14-20; not there 1891 RG12/3993-17-1]; of 4 Mainsforth Terrace, Sunderland, clerk, 1896 [IR26/237 folio 10; not there 1891 RG12/4136-30-54; not there 1901 RG13/4715-24-39].

9d.   Adelaide Dalton Prytherch, baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 10 June 1840 [BTs, Entry 3]. Aged 1, 1841 [Census]; scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854. She married 1862, Alfred Thomas Cotterell, and had issue a son and two daughters [information from John Daniel Prytherch].

10d.   Edward Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 31 July 1842 [BLG] and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 1 September 1842 [BTs, Entry 140]. Scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854; of 8 Stratford Villa, Llanstephan, Carmarthenshire, annuitant, widower, 1881 [RG11/5396-19-19]. He died at Victoria Lodging House, Westport, Edinburgh, 15 August 1885. His administration granted 24 July 1891 [PPR, £321-6-6]. He had married in Carmarthen RD, December Quarter 1862, Margaretta Williams. She had died before 1881. They had issue a son and daughter [information from John Daniel Prytherch].

11d.   John Dalton Prytherch, born at Carmarthen, 21 January 1844 [BLG] and baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 26 February 1844 [BTs, Entry 231]. Scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854; with mother, unmarried, mariner, 1871 [Census]. He died at Monmouth, Monmouthshire, 12 November 1874 [PPR Calendar], aged 30. His will as of Monmouth dated 1 October 1874 proved 24 June 1876 [PPR folio 508, Under £1,500]. He had married in Strand RD, September Quarter 1871, Sarah Maria Cottrell [GRO Marriage Index], daughter of Thomas Cotterell. Of Monmouth, sole legatee and executrix to husband, 1876.

12d.   Agnes Dalton Prytherch, baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 30 June 1845 [BTs, Entry 303]. Scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854; with mother, unmarried, annuitant, 1871 [Census]; living 1901. She had married in Carmarthen RD, June Quarter 1871, Henry Bowen Davies [GRO Marriage Index]. Living 1901.

13d.   Blanche Dalton Prytherch, baptised at St Peter, Carmarthen, 9 September 1846 [BTs, Entry 358]. Scholar at home, 1851 [Census]; named in will of father, 1854. A death in this name registered at Carmarthen, December Quarter 1856 [GRO Death Index].

Page 52 - re William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, add the following entry [I am indebted to Mr Christopher Quaile for drawing my attention to the entry in Fox-Davies ii  (1930) 1660]:

1742. Anne Williams, Lady Prendergast (d. 1770). There is a tradition amongst the descendants of Lieutenant William Roberts, R.N. (d. 1791) that he was the son of Anne Williams, a Maid of Honour to Queen Caroline, by William, Duke of Cumberland, and adopted by his uncle Sir Robert Williams [Fox-Davies, ii (1930) 1660]. However, although Anne Williams, an heiress in North Wales, recklessly extravagant and with a dubious reputation, undoubtedly knew the Duke, no contemporary evidence of any affair or child is known. Indeed, the evidence is that William Roberts was born (after her marriage) in 1742, the illegitimate son of her brother, Sir Robert Williams (d. 1745) and his mistress Margaret Roberts, and that Anne adopted the boy and subsequently bequeathed him the property she thought she possessed. The facts were set out by R.T. Jenkins, 'Some pages in the history of Pant Glas, Ysbity Ifan' in Transactions of Caernarvonshire Historical Society, x (1949) 26-29, some details being earlier given in CB iii (1903) 213 note b, sub Williams, ex information of H.R. Hughes, of Kinmel. The only evidence of any connection between Anne and the Duke appears in a letter that she wrote to him from Dublin, 27 April 1754, soliciting the Postmaster-generalship of Ireland for her husband and saying, 'When I was in a way of Life of being known to you I am sure you then would have forgiven this liberty & upon that presumption only I take the courage of soliciting yr. Grace's interest on Sir Thomas's behalf ' [Jenkins, as above, 27, quoting BL Add MS 32735 folio 196]. R.T. Jenkins concludes, 'I feel certain that William Roberts was no child of theirs'; Sir Robert brought up the child and on his death his sister took over the upkeep [Jenkins, as above, 27-28].

 

She was Anne Williams, only daughter of Sir Griffith Williams, 6th Baronet (cr. 1661), of Marl (near Conway) and Pant Glas, co. Caernarvon, Sheriff of Caernarvonshire in 1707-8 (died 1734) [his administration granted 4 October 1734 and September 1790], by his wife Catherine, eldest daughter and co-heiress of Owen Anwyl, of Penrhyn-dau-draeth and of Park, Merionethshire (they married 1734; she died 1726) [J.E. Griffith, Pedigrees of Anglesey and Carnarvonshire Families (1914) 43, 186-7; CB iv (1904) 232]. She was a Maid of Honour to Queen Caroline (died 1737); administratrix to only brother Sir Robert Williams, 7th Baronet (a minor in 1734 who died unmarried, November 1745), 9 January 1745/6. She separated from her second husband in 1762 and lived at Pant Glas but died without issue at Nant Gwilym, in Bodfari, co. Flint, 15 December 1770; buried in family vault at Llan-rhos, co. Carnarvon, 21 December 1770 [J.Y.W. Lloyd, History of Powys Fadog v (1881-7) 110 notes a tradition that she died 'in a poor-house at Eglwys-Wen or Whitechurch, near Denbigh']. Her will as 'Dame Anne Prendergast otherwise Williams of Pant Glas', dated 1766 proved at St Asaph (by William Roberts, residuary legatee), 8 February 1771 (proved also in Ireland, 1771). She had married 1stly, 11 January 1739, Sir Thomas Prendergast, 2nd and last Baronet (suc. 1709). M.P. (Ireland) for Clonmel, 1727-60; called 'an Irish blockhead' by George II, 1733 [Hervey i (1884) 200]; P.C. 17 August 1733; M.P. for Chichester, 1733-4; Postmaster-General (Ireland), 1754. He died without issue, 23 September 1760. His will proved (Ireland) 1760 [CB iv (1904) 232]. She married 2ndly, with settlement dated 27 January 1761, his distant kinsman, Captain Terence Prendergast. He assumed the surname Williams in addition to that of Prendergast in accordance with the marriage settlement, 1761. They were separated by deed, 28 December 1762. He died at Marl, 30 October 1779; buried at Llan-rhos [Jenkins, as above, 28; CB iv (1904) 232, sub Prendergast, has 3 October 1776]. Her brother's illegitimate child was:

 

William Roberts, baptised at Conway, 10 June 1742, the entry being: 'June the thenth (sic) 1742 Baptz'd William ye Reputed child of sir Robert Williams of Marle, Bart., by Margaret Roberts his concubine' [Jenkins, as above, 28]. Named in will of Anne Prendergast ('William Roberts, Gentleman, now living with me at Pantglas', 1766, and residuary legatee, 1771; had left Pant Glas by November 1770 when his second child was born at Nant Gwilym in Bodfari [Jenkins, as above, 29]; entered Royal Navy; Lieutenant, 1779. Involved in litigation with Prendergast family, he died suddenly in London, 7 July 1791 [Jenkins, as above, 29; CB iv (1904) 232, has July 1794]. He had married 1stly, at Ysbity Ifan, November 1767, Jane Morris, said to have been a maid to Ann Prendergast. They had issue 7 children. He had married 2ndly, in Hampshire, 1784, and had further issue 4 children. His issue is said to have included [Fox-Davies ii (1930) 1660]:

 

1a. Hugh Roberts, born atTremeirchion, Flintshire, 1778-9 [1851 Census]; of Beacons Hill, Denbigh, plumber, 1851 [HO107/2507-442-36]. He married 2ndly, Esther Davies, youngest daughter of John Davies. She was born at Denbigh, 1800-1 [1851 Census]. Aged 50, 1851; aged 80, 1881, widow of plumber [1881 Census]. They had (with a son Robert Morris Roberts, aged 7 in 1851] issue:

 

         1b.  Griffith Williams Roberts (eldest son), born 9 August 1841. L.R.C.P. Edinburgh; M.D.; of Cochwillan, Vale Street, Denbigh, 1880. He died in St Asaph RD, 1905, aged 64 [GRO Death Index]. He had married 23 September 1864, Ellen Rebecca Sharpe, only child of Samuel Sharpe. She was born at Holywell, Flintshire, 1845-6 [1881 Census]. They had issue: 

1c. Lincoln Williams Roberts, born 26 June 1865 and died 3 July 1865.

2c. Lincoln Williams Roberts, born 14 October 1866. B.A. 1888; M.A. Cambridge, 1896; L.S.A. (London) 1905; of Cochwillan, Denbigh; he died 14 January 1931; administration (with will) granted to sister Irene, 28 May 1931 (£4,267-18-9). Used arms of Williams; ee Fox-Davies ii (1930) 1660.

3c. Hugh Sharpe Williams Roberts, born 5 February 1869.

4c. Purcell Horatia Leigh Roberts, born 25 March 1875 and died 29 September 1875.

5c. Irene Ianthe Williams Roberts, born 1881. Of The Green Christleton, near Chester. She died unmarried, 19 August 1962; probate granted 4 December 1962 (£7,440-19-8).

Page 62 Line 12, for 'Thorns' read 'Thoms'.

Page 63 - Hannah Lightfoot

I do not think that the following advertisement for Hannah Lightfoot, which appeared in the London newspaper, Star, for Monday, 13 May 1793 (Issue 1575), Page 1b (and elsewhere in that issue, and again on Tuesday, 14 May 1793), has previously been noted [found by me on 30 July 2008]. It follows the death of Isaac Axford's second wife in 1791. If inserted on his behalf it shows that he did not know whether Hannah Lightfoot was alive when he married Mary Bartlett on 3 December 1759. However, it seems perhaps more likely to have been inserted by Mary Bartlett's relatives in the hope of proving her marriage invalid:

"HANNAH LIGHTFOOT, Spinster, or HANNAH AXFORD, the Wife of Isaac Axford, alias the Pretty Quaker. If any person can, and will give information and proof, whether Hannah Axford, the wife of Isaac Axford, late of Ludgate-hill, in the City of London, grocer, and whose maiden name was Hannah Lightfoot, and who formerly lived in St James's Market, and was generally known by the appellation of 'the Pretty Quaker', was living on the 4th of December, 1759, and if since dead, when and where she died, shall be handsomely rewarded by Mess. Hill and Meredith, Attornies, Gray's Inn, London, to whom the information is requested to be given".


Page 70 - Mrs John Rex

I am indebted to Mr Nicholas Royal for drawing my attention to the Vicar General marriage licence for the first marriage of Mrs John Rex, the mother of George Rex of Knysna. A licence was issued by the Vicar General on 3 October 1749 for the marriage of William Perigoe and Sarah Creasey at Highgate. I have not seen the licence but the following entry appears in the Marriage Registers of St Michael, Highgate, "16 Octobr 1749 William Perigoe of the Parish of Saint Mary Newington in the County of Surry Widower and Sarah Creasey of the Parish of Saint George Southwark in the County aforsd Spinster were married pr Lic A.B." [Registers, LMA X96/479].

Page 77 - Henry Meyer.

The exact relationship of Henry Meyer (c.1782/3-1847) to John Hoppner remains something of a mystery and I am indebted to Mr Michael J. Wood for bringing to my attention some details of Meyer's descendants to whom he is distantly related. The account of Henry Meyer by Annette Peach  in ODNB [vol. 37 (2004) 986-7] calls him 'Henry Hoppner Meyer' (though he does not appear to have been called that in his lifetime), suggesting that his baptism is to be found at St Paul Covent Garden, 10 February 1784, son of John Henry Meyer, engraver, and Elizabeth. However, the entry in the registers [printed in Harleian Society, xxxiv (1906) 108] does not actually give the occupation of the father. That his parents were the John Meyer and Anna Torade Hoppner who married at St James Westminster in 1767 seems most likely, but remains unproven. That Henry Meyer was a nephew of Hoppner was stated by Joseph Farington, where he is called 'Mier' [8 February 1810], and in the obituary of Hoppner in Gentleman's Magazine [1847 ii 665].

The account of Henry Meyer in ODNB gives no details of his private life but his engravings were published from Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, 1809-13, and he must be the Henry Meyer (called Henry John Meyer in 1813), described as an artist in Great Russell Street in 1817, who married at Southam, Warwickshire, 4 June 1805, Maria Snow, daughter of Bernard Geary Snow, of Southam, surgeon and apothecary [his will dated 17 February 1800 proved 13 February 1811, PCC PROB11/1519] by his wife Rebecca [her will as of Bicester, Oxfordshire, dated 21 March 1828 proved 22 May 1829, PCC PROB11/1756; IR26/1208 folio 157], and had various children baptised at St George Bloomsbury between 1807 and 1826.

Henry Meyer was of Red Lion Square, Middlesex, 22 December 1828, when described as 'artist, printseller, publisher & picture dealer, dealer & chapman' he went bankrupt [London Gazette, 26 December 1828, Page 2406] and was ordered to make full disclosure of his debts and assets to his creditors on 2 and 13 January and 6 February 1829 when assignees would be appointed. His certificate was to be allowed unless cause was shewn to the contrary before 10 March 1829 [London Gazette, 17 February 1829, Page 317] and commissioners were to meet 6 November 1829 to audit the accounts of his assignees [London Gazette, 13 October 1829, Page 1881]. A dividend was to be declared 12 November 1830 [London Gazette, 15 October 1830, Page 2175]. He and his wife were mentioned in the will of her mother in March 1828, Maria receiving the interest on £1,000 for life free from the debts of her husband. Between 1826 and 1836, if the below details of his children are correct, he seems to have been living in Paddington as 'George Mayer'. However, he was not with his wife in 1841; she was at Euston Place, Marylebone, aged 55, Independent, that year [HO107/686-10-25r] and died in St Pancras RD, 14 September 1856 [IR26/1208 folio 157; GRO Death Index, 1b 98]. Henry Meyer has not been located in the Census in 1841 but he died as Henry Meyer in St Pancras RD, June Quarter 1847 [GRO Death Indexes, 1 237].

They appear to have had the following children:

1a.   Frederick John Meyer, born 8 January 1807 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 27 June 1807, son of Henry and Mary Meyer [Registers].

2a.   Hellen Mary Meyer, born 27 March 1809 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 6 July 1809, daughter of Henry and Maria Meyer [Registers]. She died at Lyme Regis, Dorset, 1900.

3a.   Bernard Francis Hoppner Meyer, born 20 April 1811 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 25 December 1811, son of Henry and Maria Meyer [Registers].

4a.   Emily Maria Meyer, born 4 August 1813 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 3 November 1813, son of Henry John and Maria Meyer, Gentleman, of Great Russell Street, St George's Bloomsbury [Registers, Entry 244, Page 31]. She died unmarried in Reigate RD, 27 June 1871, aged 46 [IR26/1208 folio 157; GRO Death Index, Reigate 2a 79].

5a.   Beatrice Elizabeth Jane Meyer, born 15 September 1815 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 26 October 1817, daughter of Henry & Maria Meyer, artist, of Great Russell Street, St George's Bloomsbury [Registers, Entry 1577, Page 198].

6a.   Henry Meyer, born 24 July 1817 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 26 October 1817, son of Henry & Maria Meyer, artist, of Great Russell Street, St George's Bloomsbury [Registers, Entry 1578, Page 198]. He died June 1838.

7a.   George Warwick Meyer, born 4 October 1819 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 11 September 1821, son of Henry & Maria Meyer, artist, of Red Lion Square, St George the Martyr [Registers, Entry 709, Page 89].

8a.   Edmund Thomas Adams Meyer, born 9 August 1822 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 3 October 1822, son of Henry & Maria Meyer, artist, of Red Lion Square, St George the Martyr [Registers, Entry 1128, Page 141].

9a.   Caroline Elizabeth Meyer, born 9 February 1826 and baptised at St George Bloomsbury, 28 June 1826, daughter of Henry & Maria Meyer, artist, of Red Lion Square, St George the Martyr [Registers, Entry 21, Page]. With mother, aged 15, 1841. She died 14 December 1894 [IR26/1208 folio 157]. As Caroline Elizabeth Meyer, of Brecknock Street, daughter of Henry Meyer, dead, she married by banns at St James, Paddington, Middlesex, 3 November 1856, John Rolls Tims, railway clerk, of St Ann's Gardens, son of John Chamberlin Tims, tutor [Registers, Entry 23, Page 12].

10a.   Maria Meyer, baptised at St James, Paddington, Middlesex, 6 September 1826 [Registers, Entry 21, Page 3, 'Maria, daughter of George & Maria Mayer, of Paddington, gentleman' (? the same person as Caroline Elizabeth Meyer)].

11a.   Clara Ann Meyer, born 25 December 1828 and baptised at St James, Paddington, Middlesex, 27 May 1829 [Registers, Entry 747, Page 94, 'Clara, daughter of George & Maria Mayer, of Paddington, gentleman']. With mother, aged 12, 1841. She died at Wellington, New Zealand, 30 June 1916 [IR26/1208 folio 157], leaving issue. As Clara Anne Meyer, of Brecknock Street, daughter of Henry Meyer, dead, she had married by banns at St Pancras Old Church, 3 November 1856, Thomas Henry Tims, railway clerk, of Brecknock Street, son of John Chamberlin Tims, tutor [Registers, Entry 22, Page 11].

12a.  Lewis Meyer, baptised at St James, Paddington, Middlesex, 31 October 1832 [Registers, Entry 1950, Page 244, 'Lewis, son of George & Maria Mayer, of Paddington, gentleman'].

13a.   Georgiana Meyer, baptised at St James, Paddington, Middlesex, 29 June 1836 [Registers, Entry 766, Page 96, 'Georgiana, daughter of George & Maria Mayer']. Not with mother, 1841.

Page 78 Line 43, delete 'his'.

Page 100 Last line, for 'Past' read 'Post'.

Page 112 - Mrs Maguire.

Ann Davies married Charles Maguire, by Licence, at St James, Westminster, 22 March 1809 [Registers, No Entry Number, Page 103], i.e. after the birth of her child George Joseph Robert Davis Maguire on 12 April 1808 but before his baptism on 29 April 1810.

Page 127 re William Henry Ryves and James Stafford Ryves

The baptismal registers of St Mary, Lambeth, show that the brothers William Henry Ryves and James Stafford Ryves, sons of Anthony Thomas & Lavinia Janetta Horton RYVES, of Portland Place South, gent., were baptised by Henry Clissold, on 30 June 1840 [Registers, Page 102, Entries 1811-12]; their dates of birth are not given.

Page 127 re Britannia Brock

The Banns Book of St Matthew, Brixton, show that banns were read there on 5 December 1830 for the marriage of Thomas Brock bachelor and Britannia Serres spinster, both of this parish [Banns Book, Entry 287].

Page 144 Line 17, for '190S' read '1905'.

Page 152 Line 45, for '2S' read '25'.

Page 158 - Randolph Payne.

The death of Randolph Payne's first wife, Elizabeth New, was reported in The Morning Chronicle for Tuesday, 16 December 1823: "On the 13th instant after a short but severe illness, aged 37, Elizabeth, wife of Randolph Payne of Southampton Street, Covent Garden, leaving a disconsolate husband and six young children to mourn the loss of the most affectionate of wives, the best of mothers, a true and fathful Christian". There was a shorter notice in Jackson's Oxford Journal for Saturday, 20 December 1823.

Page 162 Line 43, for 'below' read 'above'.

Page 165 re Jane Mills and Robert Moore Bowman

The burial register of St Mary, Islington, Middlesex, shows that Robert Moore Bowman, of Belinda Terrace, aged 58, was buried there on 5 September 1851 by William Dix [Registers, Page 145, Entry 1153].

Page 170 - re Mrs Fitzherbert (additional entries).

 

18.           James Henry Adolph Hayward. Among the more bizarre of the claims about the supposed children of Mrs Fitzherbert is that relating to one James Henry Adolph Hayward [Wikipedia, 2008, sub Maria Fitzherbert] who is said to have been the subject of an agreement between Mrs Fitzherbert and William IV made on 17 May 1832 whereby Hayward, his wife and children, then living at Dublin, were to receive annuities of £6,000 p.a., and a sum deposited in the Bank of England intended to accrue to £1,000,000 by 1912 (less the amount of the annuities), in return for quietly removing to America within a year of the agreement and not returning to 'any part of Western Europe before 1912 unless recalled by Parliament'. A representative of the King is said to have made the arrangements for the family to emigrate 'without having their names entered in the ship's manifest', but Hayward 'died about the time they reached America'. His widow, who used the name Mrs Catherine Fitzherbert, is said to have tried to obtain the annuity from Queen Victoria, but to have been rebuffed in a personal letter dated 29 February 1840. The details come from a paper believed to have been written in the 1940s and placed online in April 2000 at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dryer/madline.htm

 

The agreement, a copy of which was sent to me in 1988, is so obviously a fabrication (perhaps made in 1912) that this improbable story is hardly worthy of serious consideration. The document is dated 17 May 1832 at the height of the Reform Bill crisis when none of the witnesses ('Charles Gray [sic], E. of R.', 'Henry Brougham, Chancellor' and 'Arthur Wellesley, P.M.') actually held office (Lord Grey's administration had resigned on 10 May and did not resume office until 18 May 1832) and it is signed 'William R Windsor', 'Alexandrina, P.R.' and 'Maria Ann Fitzherbert'. Attached is a patent creating 'James Henry Adolph Fitzgeorge, Son of our Predecessor and his wife, formerly Mrs Maria Ann Fitzherbert' a 'Peer of the Realm, After A.D. 1912, with Hereditary Title of Duke of Malta', signed by 'William IV Rex'. Not one of the signatories would have subscribed their names in this way.

 

Some details of the family from the birth of James Theus Fitzherbert or Shadduck (supposedly at sea) in 1846 onwards are given below but it is not clear how much beyond this can be substantiated from contemporary documents. Queries submitted to The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society in the Spring of 2003 suggested that Mr Hayward died at Fraunces Tavern, New York, that his widow, Catherine Evangeline Fitzherbert was living with James Clarence, Thomas Edward, Maryanne and Helena Fitzherbert, in the Washington Market area of New York City and in Richmond, Staten Island, 1832/3-1847, and that Maryanne and Helena were at Albany, 1840-44, whilst James was at Poughkeepsie, 1844-1846. Contemporary evidence for these statements may exist but has not been seen.

 

The later history of the family [as given by Mr Rod Dyer, 3 April 2003, on http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dryer is as follows, James Henry Adolph Hayward being said to have had issue by his wife Catherine an only child:

 

1a.           James Clarence Fitzherbert, of Boston, Massachusetts. After the birth of his son and the death of his wife he is said to have deposited the family agreement with his father-in-law and gone to the goldfields of California, dying during the journey or shortly afterwards. He had married 5 July 1844, Hallena (or Helen) Shadduck, of Albany, New York, daughter of Evert (or Everitt) Shadduck or Shaddick (1806-1876), of Shunk, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, by his 2nd wife Helena Flora Day. She was born 1827 and died shortly after the birth of her son in 1846. They had issue an only child:

 

1b.           James Theus Fitzherbert, born 'about fifteen miles out to sea off the coast of New York', 12 April 1846. Said to have been taken by his father after this mother's death to the home of his grandfather Evert Shadduck, at Shunk, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania; renamed Madison Taylor Shadduck by his grandfather and raised as his son. He died at Brookwood, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, 1 February 1931. He had married at Shunk, Pennsylvania, 4 March 1869, Harriet Matilda Riggs. They had (with other) issue:

 

1c.         Charles Herbert Shadduck, born 25 January 1870. He died 9 November 1941.

 

 

19.            Hannah Harrison Lowe (c.1795-1883). Mrs Fitzherbert almost certainly had no children and, being a devout Catholic, is most unlikely to have allowed any child of her own to be brought up as a Protestant. However, another unconvincing claim to be her child is made in a recent article on Wikipedia about Hannah Harrison Lowe [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Harrison_Lowe, accessed 13September 2012]. The details of Hannah's biography are not there given but the stories she told her daughter are outlined at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hannah-Harrison-Lowe/127902080622862?v=info [accessed 13 September 2012]. Her daughter, Ann Barnes (born in 1838/9), was the wife of Josiah Poeton, of Coventry, watch manufacturer (died 1884, aged 46), and Ann recorded her mother's stories in a document entitled 'A Family Mystery', written at Bristol in 1901, almost a hundred years after the events. That document has unfortunately not been published in full.

Hannah Harrison Lowe married Samuel Barnes (died 1875, aged 79), a boot maker, at St Michael, Coventry, Warwickshire, 30 December 1816. In the 1841 census of Fleet Street, Coventry, aged 40, she made no statement as to her place of birth [HO107/1152-13-46v], but in 1851 when at 4 Victoria Street, Coventry, aged 55, a hand loom weaver, she said that she was born at Coventry [HO107/2068-316-8]. In 1861, when at 36 Victoria Street, Coventry, aged 64, silk weaver, she said that she was born at 'Knightsbridge, London' [RG9/2208-123-17] and she repeated that statement in 1871 when at 66 Albert Street Coventry, aged 75, silk winder [RG10/3181-34-18]. In 1881 when at 9 Court 2 Castle Street, Coventry, aged 85 (with her son Samuel Barnes, cordwainer), she said that she was born at 'London, Middlesex' [RG11/3073-108-16]. She died at Coventry in 1883, aged 87. Her daughter Ann, who wrote the account, is said to have been the youngest of fourteen children.

On the face of it one would assume that although her baptism has not been found, Hannah Harrison Lowe was probably a daughter of the William Lowe and Hannah Harrison who had married at Holy Trinity, Coventry, on 30 July 1791, a marriage not mentioned in the above cited accounts.

However, Hannah Harrison Lowe apparently told her daughter that she was the daughter of the Prince of Wales and Mrs Fitzherbert and that she was born suddenly in a baby linen shop kept by a Mrs Fletcher in London in 1795 and given into the care of Mrs Lowe. The exact date of birth is unfortunately not given. The girl is said to have remembered meeting her parents at a house in Park Lane in November 1800 (when the Prince is said to have given her some valuable jewellery) and she stayed with Mrs Lowe until 1803 when she was eight years old and Mr Lowe stole the jewellery and her clothing. Mrs Lowe took a job as a cook in an hotel and a frequent visitor, Captain Roberts, provided money for the girl's upkeep. Mrs Lowe then took Hannah to stay with her mother, Mrs Harrison, at Bulkington about six miles north of Coventry in Warwickshire. Hannah was brought up 'as a village child' and when 14, in 1809, she was apprenticed to a ribbon weaver. She served three months 'without pay' and three months on 'half pay' and after only six months servitude (perhaps because of lack of work) was kept on as a housemaid, something that often happened with the half-pay system in the Coventry area. This may suggest that Hannah was abandoned by her grandmotherand that her apprenticeship was paid for by the parish. Hannah did not see her mother again until after her marriage to Samuel Barnes in 1815.

There is much Bulkington poor law and settlement material which needs investigation and may throw further light on the matter and this unlikely story. [AJC 19 September 2012].

20.   John Graves Wyatt. Yet another story about the supposed "children" of Mrs Fitzherbert appears in the unreferenced text of her biography on Wikipedia [accessed 28 September 2012] where it said that on her death [in 1837] "her children were adopted by a Scotch family named Wyatt whose name they assumed. Afterwards they came south settling in Erith, Kent. The Wyatt family, in the person of J. G. Wyatt, a former Erith man who later moved to Moose Fair [sic], Saskatchewan, Canada and Isabella Annie Wyatt claimed title to a portion of the Fitzherbert estate in 1931". Their claim is mentioned in the Lethbridge Herald, Saskatchewan, 22 May 1937, pages 1 & 9, and is presumably the claim mentioned in the Chelmsford Chronicle, Friday, 9 April 1937, page 7, which had previously been mentioned in the previous Friday's Daily Mail [not seen].

This is presumably John George Wyatt who was born at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, about 1872, and was at 14 Cheshunt Road, Erith, aged 29, a cartage contractor, in 1901 [RG13/700-42-14] and was a painter at Moose Jaw in 1913. He was the son of John Graves Wyatt who was born at Bexley, Kent, c.1848-9, and died at 219 Lower Road, Belvedere, Kent, 18 June 1933, aged 85, who had married Sarah Ann Starr in Woolwich RD in the December Quarter of 1869 [1d 1185]. He in turn was the son of another John Graves Wyatt who had a varied career and died in Woolwich RD, in the December Quarter of 1900 [1d 697], aged 83, by his second wife Frances Lomax, nee Medhurst, whom he had married at All Saints, Poplar, 28 September 1847 [Registers, Page 11, Entry 21]. At that time this first John Graves Wyatt said that he was a widower and the son of Jeremiah Wyatt, baker. Describing himself as John Greaves Wyatt, of full age, hairdresser, bachelor, the son of William Wyatt, butcher, he had married firstly at Pudsey St Lawrence, Yorkshire, 30 November 1841, Rachel Taylor, of full age, spinster. daughter of Thomas Taylor, hairdresser [Registers].

John Greaves Wyett, an adult, of Bermondsey Street, hairdresser, born 28 October 1818, was baptised at St John Horsleydown, 24 November 1841 [Registers, Page 290, Entry 238].

In the 1841 census of Bermondsey Street, St John Horsleydown [HO107/1087-7-35v] John Wyatt said that he was aged 22, hair dresser, not born in Surrey (with him were two apprentice hairdressers). His first wife died at 19 Bermondsey Street, in 1845, when he was present at the death and a hairdresser. In the 1851 census of London Road, Bexley [HO107/1607-121-20] John Graves Wyatt said that he was aged 32, a baker, and born in "Middlesex, City". In the 1861 Census of Plumstead he was aged 41 and born at Smithfield, London, a statement repeated in 1871 when he was aged 52, an auctioneer, at 31 Plumstead Road, Plumstead [RG10/787-7-8].

Further information about the origins of John Graves or Greaves Wyatt or Wyett would be welcome. He was an executor to Stephen Jeffery in 1861, went bankrupt in 1868, was a lodging house keeper in 1882, and a jobmaster in 1890 [entries in London Gazette].

 

Page 167 re Sophia Elizabeth Guelph Sims

The burial of Sophia Elizabeth Guelph Sims has been found in that name at the New Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, 19 July 1846, aged 44, of Lower Street, Islington, buried in Lower Ground [Registers, No Page or Entry Number]. Her death was registered at Islington, September Quarter 1846, vol. 3, page 182.

Page 172 re Horace Hayman Wilson

The baptism of Horace Hayman Wilson, which long evaded searchers, has been found at the Percy Chapel, St Pancras. He was born 26 September 1786 and baptised as 'Horace Hayman son of George & Hannah Wolstone' at the Percy Chapel, St Pancras [Registers, no Page or Entry Number].

Page 174 - George IV [additional entry]

1788 Sarah Read (1777-1838). I am indebted to Elizabeth Miller for bringing to my attention (in June 2012) the book Mostly fun: my life by one who has led it by Jim Leslie (1922) which in Chapter 3, 'The Read Connection' (pages 13-29), sets out the known facts and traditions about one Captain George Frederick Read who was born 29 September 1788 and first visited Australia as captain and part owner of the brig Lynx in 1808, eventually settling and having descendants there. He was said to be a son of George IV and Mrs Fitzherbert but it had already been established by 1922 that Sarah Till, whom Captain Read brought out from England with her husband William Till and a son John Till, was his mother, marriage records confirming that Sarah Read, widow, married William Till, widower, by licence, on 2 August 1804, at St Mary, Lambeth, both being of that parish [Parish Registers, Entry 652, Page 219].

However, this George Frederic Read, born 29 September 1788, was baptised 9 November 1788, at St Ann, Soho, Westminster, the son of George & Sarah Read [Pallot Baptismal Index], and searches now need to be made for possible further information about that couple. George Frederic Read was closely involved with Thomas Gabriel Bayliss, of Southgate, Middlesex [PCC Will as of Southgate, widower, proved 25 October 1833, PROB11/1822], and several names used by Read's children and descendants appear to come from the Bayliss family, which needs further investigation.

Page 175-6 re William Rea

The Marriage Registers of St Nicholas, Plumstead, Kent, show that the marriage of William Rea, and Christie Goulden, both of this parish, took place at Plumstead, by Banns, on 2 June 1816. She signed Christey Goulden and the witnesses were Archd. Burns and Mary Lazenby [Registers, Page 152, Entry 456].

Page 181 Line 27, for 'S' read '5'.

Page 181 - John and Elizabeth Liptrap

The Burial Register of St Mary, Whitechapel, Middlesex, shows that the burial of Elizabeth Liptrap, of Eltham, Kent, aged 82, took place there on 29 July 1843 [Registers, No Page or Entry number].

Page 181 - Elizabeth Stephen Liptrap

I am indebted to Mr Nicholas Royal for the information that Elizabeth Stephen Liptrap married at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Middlesex, 8 January 1810, William Peyton. They had issue an only daughter:

    1a.   Laura Peyton, born c.1812. She died at Temple Cottage, Southsea (the home of Sarah Rex), 12     August  1832; buried at Mile End Cemetery, Portsea, 17 August 1832. She had married Joshua Ryle, of     London Road, Brighton, Sussex, gentleman. He was born November 1812 and baptised at Croydon, 24 August 1815. He died at the house of Elizabeth Liptrap, and was buried at St Nicholas, Brighton, 24 March 1832, aged 20. They had issue an only daughter:

    1b.   Laura Ryle, born 11 November 1831 and baptised at St Nicholas, Brighton, 9 December 1831. She died at 52 Westbourne Street, Aldrington, 23 June 1887. Her will proved PPR. She had married 1stly, at St Pancras, Middlesex, 24 December 1856, Charles Tollit, of Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, school master. He was born 1832 and baptised at Hemel Hempstead, 21 February 1833. He was buried at Hemel Hempstead, 23 June 1861. She married 2ndly, at the Register Office, Steyning, 4 May 1883, James Sumner, of 52 Westbourne Street, Aldrington, Sussex, retired engineer R.N. He was born at Brompton, Kent, 1824, and died at 52 Westbourne Street, 30 November 1885. His will proved PPR.

Page 191. Sarah Brown/Elizabeth Hampshire. It was noted in Royal Mistresses and Bastards that there did not seem to be any truth in a story [repeated in Saul (1999) 80] that Sarah Brown, the daughter of the publican at the White Hart Hotel, Mile End Road, London, was for 15 years the mistress of the Prince of Wales and had four children by him, one of whom, William Hampshire (1800-1878) rose rapidly in the Lord Chamberlain's Department to become Paymaster in the Queen's Household in 1854. It had also been noted that this William Hampshire was baptised at St James, Westminster, 18 March 1800, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Hampshire.

 

I am indebted to the careful research of a descendant Peter Ashworth for the information [from family and other records cited below] that this Joseph Hampshire was apparently in the service of Jonathan Kendal at Chelwood House, near Bristol, in 1795, and as of Chelwood, Somerset, had married at Chelwood, in 1796, Elizabeth Brown, of Chelwood, who died at Walham Green, Chelsea, in 1841 and was buried in Brompton Cemetery. It seems that Joseph died at Flockton, Yorkshire (where he had been born), in 1819.

 

Joseph Hampshire's uncle, Lexey Mallinson, had been steward to the 5th Duke of Devonshire, at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire, from about 1780 until his death in 1799, and it is likely that the 6th Duke, who was Lord Chamberlain 1827-28 and 1830-34, knew of Lexey's great-nephew and obtained for him the post of Third Assistant Clerk in the Lord Chamberlain's Department in 1832.

 

The story of a royal connection appears to have been first formulated in a letter dated September 1930, from Cyril Hampshire, to his mother Alice Isabella, the wife of Revd William Knowlton Hampshire (died 1905), Vicar of Bampton, Oxfordshire, in which Cyril Hampshire claims that it had been confirmed with many circumstantial details that we now know to be quite incorrect, by the Duke of Connaught. It appears that the story was communicated by another descendant, Oliver Myers, to Sir Anthony Wagner, and by him to the Society of the Descendants of the Illegitimate Sons and Daughters of the Kings of Britain in America. The relationships of the early members of the family, commencing with Joseph Hampshire's father, were as follows:

 

John Hampshire, named in will of brother-in-law Lexey Mallinson, 1799. He had married at Flockton, Yorkshire, 6 November 1761, Margaret ('Peggy') Mallinson [Registers]. She was named in the will of her brother Lexey Mallinson, 1799. Her brother was Alexander ('Lexey') Mallinson, steward or agent to the 5th Duke of Devonshire at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire, with £50 p.a., from c.1780, who died unmarried, 15 August 1799, and was buried at Ault Hucknall, aged 66 [MI]; his will as Lexey alias Alexis Mallinson, of Hardwick in Hucknall, Derbyshire, gentleman, dated 23 April 1799 (freehold at Cotham, Nottinghamshire) proved 17 October 1799 [Consistory Court of Lichfield]. John and Margaret Hampshire had issue:

 

1a.       James Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 2 May 1762 [Registers]. Named trustee and executor in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799; he and Sarah (? his sister) Hampshire ran the Edensor Inn, near Chatsworth, 1799 [letter to uncle Lexey Mallinson in Chatsworth Archives].

 

2a.       Sarah Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 20 November 1763 [Registers]. Named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799.

 

3a.       Alexander (Lexey or Alexis) Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 15 March 1767 [Registers]. Named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799.

 

4a.       Ann Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 18 March 1770 [Registers]. Named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799.

 

5a.       Joseph Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 15 November 1771 [Registers]. Apparently in service with Jonathan Kendal at Chelwood House, near Bristol, 10 January 1795 [letter to uncle Lexey Mallinson in Chatsworth Archives]; named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799; perhaps the Joseph Hampshire buried at Flockton, 1819; gentleman, 1841 [death of widow]. As of Chelwood, Somerset, he had married by licence at Chelwood, 21 November 1796, Elizabeth Brown, of Chelwood [Registers]. She died at Walham Green, Chelsea, 20 May 1841 [GRO Death certificate; MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 27 May 1841, aged 70 [Registers, Grave No 137]. They had issue:

 

1b.       Charlotte Georgina Hampshire, born 22 December 1797, and baptised at St James, Westminster, 18 May 1798 [Registers].

 

2b.       William Hampshire, born 7 January 1800, and baptised at St James, Westminster, 18 March 1800 [Registers]. Third Assistant Clerk in Lord Chamberlain's Department, 1832 [see Royal Mistresses and Bastards for further detail]. He died at 6 St Albans Road, Kensington, 5 September 1878 [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 10 September 1878, aged 78 [Registers, Grave No 94098]. He had married at Sheffield Parish Church, Yorkshire, 31 March 1834, Elizabeth Wilson. She died at 6 St Albans Road, Kensington, 27 July 1867 [MI]; buried 31 July 1867, aged 63 [Family Paper]. They had issue:

 

1c.       Mary Hampshire, born 19 February 1835, and baptised at St Luke, Chelsea, 19 February 1835 [Registers]. She married at St Mary Abbots, Kensington, 2 July 1856, Alexander Turner Cory, and had issue.

 

2c.       William Knowlton Hampshire, born 10 November 1836, and baptised at St Luke, Chelsea, 7 December 1836 [Registers]. He died 2 December 1905. He had married and had issue.

 

3c.       Henry Charles Hampshire, born 23 January 1838, and baptised at St Martin in the Fields, Middlesex, 2 July 1838 [Registers]. He died at 9 Crescent Road, Wimbledon, 17 August 1910 [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 20 August 1910, aged 72 [Registers, Grave No 94098].

 

4c.       Alfred George Hampshire, born 13 August 1839. He died at 4 Maddox Street, Regent Street, 5 June 1890 [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 7 June 1890, aged 50 [Registers, Grave No 94098].

 

5c.       Frederick Thomas Hampshire, born 5 November 1840. He died 23 January 1842, aged 14 months [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery.

 

6c.       Elizabeth Georgiana Hampshire, born 3 February 1842. She died at Bampton, Oxfordshire, 2 May 1912 [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 4 May 1912, aged 70 [Registers, Grave No 171348].

 

7c.       Frederick Knowlton Hampshire, born at 16 Sussex Place, Kensington, 15 November 1843, and baptised at St Mary Abbots, Kensington, 12 February 1845 [Registers]. He died 16 May 1894, aged 50. He had married Jessie Clara Everest. She died 20 February 1934, aged 88. They had issue.

 

8c.       Louisa Maria Hampshire, born 31 August 1845, and baptised at St Mary Abbots, Kensington, 24 September 1845 [Registers]. She died unmarried at Manor Cottage, Bampton, Oxfordshire, 1926; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 27 February 1926, aged 80 [Registers, Grave No 94098].

 

3b.       Georgiana Margaret Hampshire, born 22 November 1801, and baptised at St James, Westminster, 1 December 1801 [Registers]. She died unmarried at 9 Upper Ranelagh Street, Pimlico, 20 March 1861 [MI]; buried at Brompton Cemetery, 25 March 1861, aged 59 [Registers, Grave No 26739].

 

6a.       Hannah Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 8 September 1775, and buried there 15 January 1778 [Registers].

 

7a.       Elizabeth Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 21 December 1777 [Registers]. Named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799.

 

8a.       John Hampshire, baptised at Flockton, Yorkshire, 13 January 1782 [Registers]. Named in will of uncle Lexey Mallinson, 1799.

Page 197 - additional entry [27 November 2008].

 

c.1805. Countess Olga Jerebtzov or Gerebtzoff (or Zherebzova) (1766-1849). Although aware of the suggestion that the Prince of Wales was the father of a son (who took the surname Nord) by Countess Olga Jerebtzov I did not include her in Royal Mistresses and Bastards (2007) as the known details were so flimsy. However, as the suggestion now appears in Wikipedia (sub Olga Zherebtsova) I have decided to set out here what I know in the hope that those with additional knowledge will come forward to throw light on the matter. I am indebted to Miss Lynda Raistrick for the details from the Leeds parish registers.

 

In 1836 Sir N.W. Wraxall wrote that Charles Whitworth (1752-1825), British ambassador at St Petersburg from 1788 to 1800 (Knight of the Bath in 1793, created Baron Whitworth in 1800, Viscount in 1813, and Earl in 1815), an old friend of the Prince of Wales [CGPoW i (1963) 204] but a man of limited financial means, was in great measure supported by Countess Gerbetzow (sic) and 'In return for such solid proofs of attachment, he engaged to give her his hand in marriage' when she had obtained a divorce from her husband. However, he left for England in May 1800 and in April 1801 married the immensely wealthy Dowager Duchess of Dorset. According to Wraxall, Countess Gerbetzow, having succeeded in procuring a divorce from her husband, had meanwhile set out for London, but arrived after the marriage had taken place. She then sought to obtain restitution of the sums that she had advanced to her lover on the assurance of marriage and was paid £10,000 by the Duchess [N.W. Wraxall, Posthumous memoirs of his own time, i (1836) 188-194].

 

At the Brighton Pavilion, in November 1805, Thomas Creevey heard that she was 'a very rich Russian woman of quality who is coming to Lord Berkeley's house. She has been long in England, and is I suppose generally known in London, though new to me'. Mrs Fitzherbert told him that the Countess, who had been married at the age of 14, had kept Lord Whitworth in Russia and had got as far as Berlin when she heard that he was married. He added, 'She was raving mad for some time, and Mrs. F. describes her as being often nearly so now, but at other times most interesting, and most miserable. Her husband and children come to England to visit her, and Mrs F. says she is an eternal subject of remorse to Lord Whitworth' [Creevey i (1904) 67]. Elsewhere Creevey mentioned 'Madame Gerobtzoff' as 'a haughty Russian dame, who made row enough for the whole town to hear' when at the Pavilion, also in 1805, Sheridan sat on her lap in the dark at a phantasmagoria [Creevey i (1904) 57]. Lady Bessborough wrote about her (as 'Madame Gerebzoff') in November 1804 and August 1805 [Granville i (1917) 476-77, 492], saying that 'The office of Husband in Russia seems to be a sinecure', describing her, in the words of Pope's Philomel, as 'Chaste to her Husband, frank to all besides', and adding, 'I knew her Mother very well; she was too fat, but very handsome' [Granville ii (1917) 103].

 

The Complete Peerage says that although the story of the alleged liaison between the Countess and Lord Whitworth obtained some credence in 1805 it was, in the main, refuted in the Quarterly Review, vol. lvii (December 1836), pp. 470-71 [CP xii/2 (1959) 620-21 note e]. Indeed, the article in the Quarterly Review (a lengthy and damaging review of Wraxall's memoirs by an anonymous author) says that 'of all this circumstantial story nothing is true, except that a certain Russian countess had a partiality for Sir Charles Whitworth while ambassador at St Petersburg', that Sir Charles's influence with the Emperor had on one occasion saved her from exile, that neither 'was ever under pecuniary obligation to the other, beyond the interchange of presents usual between lovers', that she was never divorced and that her husband Count Gerepzov 'actually accompanied her on her visit to England', as many in society would remember. The review also says that Wraxall's spite against the Duchess of Dorset arose because he had obtained some of her husband's papers and, on the pretext of his cost and trouble in arranging them, would not give them up without payment.

 

In Russia many believed that the dissolute Countess had been Whitworth's mistress and in the pay of England, channelling English funds to the conspirators against the Emperor Paul I, a charge refuted by Kazimierz Waliszewski, though they certainly met in her house [K. Waliszewski, Paul the First of Russia - The Son of Catherine the Great (London, 1913) 412-15; with greater detail in the Russian edition (St Petersburg, c.1912) 552]. It had been in her house that her brother Platon Zoubov had taken refuge on the death of the Empress Catherine II in 1796 [K. Waliszewski, Autour d'un trone: Catherine II de Russie (Paris, 1894) 167]. Waliszewski says that her money was obtained during her stay in England after Paul's murder (11/23 March 1801) when she gained the favour of the Prince of Wales, returning to Russia with a son, and subsequently acquiring one of the finest Demidof estates [K. Waliszewski, Paul the First of Russia (1913) 413]. However, the genealogist Nicolas Ikonnikov says that she had long before had an open liaison with the fabulously wealthy Prokofi Akinfievitch Demidov (1710-1786) and had received from him many millions of roubles [Nicolas Ikonnikov, La Noblesse de Russie, 2nd ed., 51 vols., Paris, 1957-63, hereafter NdR].

 

Nicolas Ikonnikov (although partly confusing her with her daughter) says that after 1800 the Countess took herself to London where she was the mistress of George III (sic) and that later, in a lawsuit against the British crown, she declared that they had had a son, Egor Egorovitch Nord, but that the British court doubted it, ruling that the child was Lord Whitworth's son [NdR Borozdine (1957) No. 170 and NdR Jerebtzov (1958) No. 200, both quoting Istoritchesky Vestnik, xii (1912) 890 et seq.]. The boy is apparently called George Nord in Valentin Zubov, Zar Paul I: Mensch und Schicksal (K.F. Koehler, 1963) 221 [not seen] but no further details of the supposed court case about him have been found.

 

However, the Northampton Mercury for Saturday, 28 August 1830 [page 1f] contains the entry, 'George Nord, the gentleman said to be the son of the late King, has not been noticed by any of the members of the Royal family. To letters which have been addressed to certain high quarters, no aswer has been returned; and we understand Mr Nord has sailed, or is about to sail, for Russia.' [Noted 18 November 2012, but not apparently mentioned elsewhere in the currently available online newspaper databases].

 

She was Countess Olga Alexandrovna Zoubov, born 1766 [NdR Zoubov (1962) No. 142], daughter of Count Alexander Nikolaevitch Zoubov (1727-1795) and his wife Elisaveta Vassilieva Voronov (1742-1813) [NdR Zoubov (1962) No. 121], and a sister of Prince Platon Zoubov (1767-1822) [NdR Zoubov (1962) No. 143], the last favourite of the Empress Catherine II. According to Wikipedia in later years she returned to St Petersburg, became involved in Court intrigues centred on her grandson-in-law Prince Alexei Orlov (1796-1861), and was a patron of Alexander Herzen (presumably before his imprisonment in 1832) who describes her 'like a tree in winter' in his memoirs My Past and Thoughts (1861-67). She died 1 March 1849. She had married (before 1783), Alexandre Alexeevitch Jerebtzov, born 30 August 1754. Privy Councillor, Chamberlain to Empress Catherine II. He died 28 June 1807 [NdR Jerebtzov (1958) No. 145]. They had issue: Anna Jerebtzov (1783-1785), the below mentioned Elisaveta Jerebtzov (1787-1841) and Alexander Jerebtzov (15 October 1790 - 24 February 1817) [NdR Jerebtzov (1958) Nos. 198, 199, 200]. The latter's dates are elsewhere given (from primary sources) as 1781-1832 [Alexander Mikaberidze, The Russian Officer Corps in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1792-1815 (Staplehurst, 2005) 464 sub Zherebtsov].

 

There is some confusion in the pedigrees compiled by Nicolas Ikonikoff between Olga Alexandrovna and her daughter Elisaveta Alexandrovna Jerebtzov, born 1787, Dame de l'Ordre de Ste Catherine petite-croix, who is called Olga Alexandrovna in the Biographies des Chevalier Gardes  [quoted in NdR Borozdine (1957) No. 170 and NdR Jerebtzov (1958) No. 200]. Ikonnikov attributed to Elizaveta her mother's alleged affairs with Demidov and Whitworth. Whilst her husband was absent on service in 1816 Elisaveta had a daughter Natalia [NdR Borozdine (1957) No. 198] by General Pirect (whom her husband had taken prisoner in the Napoleonic War), but although her husband accepted the paternity of the child, on his return she abandoned him to live permanently in Paris [NdR quoting Les aides de camp generaux de Alexandre I (St Petersburg, 1913)]. She died at Paris, 26 January 1841, and was buried with her husband [NdR Jerebtzov (1958) No. 200]. She had married 2 February 1804, Nikolai Mikhailovitch Borozdine [NdR Borozdine (1957) No. 170, quoting unpublished MS 'Memoirs d'un Nain' written by Iakoubovsky the dwarf to Prince Platon Zoubov]. He was born at Pskov, 13 November 1777 [Mikaberidze, op.cit. (2005) 46; NdR has 2 October 1776]. Enlisted as private in Life Guard Preobrajensky Regiment, 1782 (aged 5); sergeant, 1784; transferred to Horse Guards; cornet, 1794; transferred to Cuirassier Regiment, 1796; returned to Horse Guards, 1797; Lieutenant, 1798; Captain, 1799; joined Chevalier Guards, 1799; Colonel, 1800; chief of Finland Dragoons, 1806-11, and of Astrakhan Cuirassier Regiment, 1811-14; Major General, 1807; served in campaigns of 1805, 1807 and 1808 against Napoleon and Sweden [career in Mikaberidze, op.cit. (2005) 46-47]; at Borodino, etc., 1812; Lieutenant-General, 1813; at Leipzig; at taking of Paris, 1814; returned to Paris, 1815; commanded Reserve Cavalry Corps, 1817; aide de camp general to the Emperor, 1820; General of Cavalry, 1826; Knight of St Alexandre Nevsky. He died at St Petersburg, 14/26 November 1830; buried at Kostyjitzy (Kostyzhetsky), Pskof  [NdR Borozdine (1957) No. 170]. They had issue [NdR Borozdine (1957) Nos. 193-198].

 

Olga Jerebtsov's son, said to have been by the Prince of Wales, was:

 

1a.           Egor Egorovitch Nord [NdR Borozdine No. 170; NdR Jerebtzov (1958) No. 200] or George Nord [above quoted references]. It is said that he 'under the name of Nord, founded a family which in recent years still had a representative in Russia' [Waliszewski, op. cit. (1913) 413]. Perhaps the same person as George Charles Nord the father of:

 

George Nord, born 1844/5 [age at death]. Present at dinner given by Grand Duke Constantine, Chesham House, London [The Times, 13 September 1871, 7e, 'M. de Nord']; Second Secretary at Russian Embassy, London, 1872-3 [AdeG (1872) 574 & (1873) 608, 'assessuer de college et gentilhomme de a chambre G.Nord']; Russian Consul at Rescht, Persia, 1875-80 [AdeG, 'L'assesseur de college G.Nord']. He died, Russian Consul at Rescht, Persia, 6 August 1880, aged 35 [Pall Mall Gazette, 24 September 1880, Issue 4864, 'George De Nord']; 'formerly of the Russian Embassy in London' [Liverpool Mercury, 1 September 1885, Issue 11745, marriage of 'stepdaughter Frances Fitzroy']. As of Camberwell, son of George Charles Nord, gentleman, he had married by licence at St Giles, Camberwell, Surrey, 9 March 1872 (as her 1st husband), Mary 'Emily' Dufton FitzRoy, of Princes Square, Bayswater, daughter of Charles Augustus FitzRoy [Registers, Page 20, Entry 40], by his wife Elizabeth (they had married at St Matthew, Holbeck, Yorkshire, 19 October 1843), daughter of James Dufton, of Leeds, Yorkshire. She was born 25 September 1844 and baptised at Leeds Parish Church, 23 October 1844 [Registers, Page 491, Entry 1534]. Of Arthur Street, Leeds, 1851 [HO107/2320-1045-4]; of Nippet Lane, Leeds, scholar, 1861 [RG9/3384-67-2]. She died at Addis Ababa, Abyssinia, 9 January 1900 [The Times, 2 April 1900, 1a]. She had married 2ndly at the Russian Church of the Russian Legation, Geneva, Switzerland, 19 November 1882, Pierre de Vlassow (Pyotr Mikhailovich Vlasov), Russian Consul at Ghelau [The Times, 9 December 1882, 1a; 20 November in Manchester Times, 25 November 1882, Issue 1298]. Russian Consul at Rescht, Persia, 1884-89 [AdeG]; received Prince Dolgorouki's Mission at Teheran [The Times, 30 May 1887, 9f]; Russian Consul General at Mesched, Persia, 1890-97 [AdeG]; as Councillor of State headed Russian Embassy to Emperor Menelik of Abyssinia, leaving St Petersburg with wife, September 1897, and arriving 17 February 1898 [Bristol Mercury, 20 April 1898, Issue 15582]; Russian Minister in Abyssinia, 1898-1902 [AdeG; The Times, 2 April 1900, 1a]; on way to Teheran, 27 September 1902 [The Times, 25 October 1902, 10a]; Russian Ambassador to Persia, 1902-3 [AdeG].

Page 198 Claudius Francis du Pasquier

It appears that Claudius Francis du Pasquier was buried at St Margaret, Westminster, where there was an inscription to him as 'Claude Francis du Pasquier, died 22nd Dec. 1822, aged 64 [The Genealogists' Magazine, vol. 5, no. 11 (September 1931) page 388].

Pages 204-5 Georgiana Quentin

I am indebted to Mr David Collins for the information that Georgiana Quentin was born 2 July 1784 and baptised 30 July 1784 at St Marylebone [LMA P89/MRY1, Item 008] and that she married 21 January 1811 at St Mary, Shaw cum Donnington, Berkshire [transcript by Berks FHS via Findmypast].

Page 208-210 Edwardina Kent and John Turner Flinn. 

I am indebted to Mr Jonathan Dickson of Melbourne (who has an oil painting of John Turner Flinn) for information about the marriage and death of Edward Augustus Flinn in Victoria [information received in July 2008] and particularly to Jacqueline Rowntree (who descends from one of John Turner Flinn's sisters) for a reference to Eric de Normann's Edwardina: the story of an unfortunate woman (privately printed, Ashford, 1978) [copy in British Library X.702/5976], the 1841 Census entry in Lambeth, and to the material in the Harvard Law Library about the divorce of the younger Edwardina de Normann mentioned below [information received in December 2008].

 

The above-mentioned book [hereafter cited as 'de Normann (1978)'] was written by the late Sir Eric de Normann (1893-1982), a great-grandson of Edwardina Kent by her first marriage in Brunswick in 1814 to Gustav de Normann. Sir Eric de Normann argues that Edwardina Kent was Princess Caroline's daughter by George Canning, detailing the latter's regular visits to the Princess in 1799, and suggesting that Edwardina was born in the first half of 1800, but that Caroline deliberately made her out to be older than she was [de Normann (1978) 11-14]. Sir Eric mentions unsuccessful searches made for Edwardina's baptism at Lewisham by a Mr Brogden on behalf of the Consul at Naples when she died in 1875 [de Normann (1978) 14], and he was unaware of the baptismal entry in September 1800 that says that she was born 'about the beginning of 1798', and of the entry in The Times for 23 April 1799 that described the way in which she had been abandoned 'a short time since' [set out in Royal mistresses and bastards (2007) 208-9]. The child, if Princess Caroline's, would have been conceived many months before her friendship with George Canning developed, but there is no evidence that she was the Princess's child. The written statement of the Revd William Groves (the gullible intimate friend of the forger Olive Wilmot Serres) in May 1830 that the Duke of Kent had told him that Edwardina was Caroline's child (and thus rightful Queen of England after the death of King George IV the following month), a document that Edwardina sent to King William IV [de Normann (1987) 34], is presumably one of Olive's many productions [Royal mistresses and bastards (2007) 114-7].

 

Sir Eric also argues that Princess Caroline's purpose in leaving England in 1814 and apparently forcing Edwardina into marriage, was, as Sir William Gell put it, 'to get rid of her for ever' [de Normann (1978) 18]. Sir William's description of Edwardina's marriage as 'a very good sale of a very bad piece of Goods', however, probably means that the group were already glad to be rid of her on personal grounds. That she was forced into marriage is conjectured from the record saying that it took place 'at 10 p.m. by special order of the Duke without banns' [de Normann (1978) 25] but the 'special order' was merely to dispense with the customary banns, the Princess leaving Brunswick the following day. There is a tradition in the family of Gustav de Normann's second wife, Theresa von der Mulbe, that Edwardina was pregnant by the Duke of Brunswick, that the child died an infant, and that she had other illegitimate children outside marriage, but these stories are dismissed by Sir Eric [de Normann (1978) 26]. No record of the birth of her (? only) child by Gustav de Normann, probably before or about May 1815, has been found [de Normann (1978) 27-28]. That they were divorced in June 1820, although 'confirmed by the Archives' [de Normann (1978) 31], remains uncertain, no details being given, though both parties remarried (she describing herself as a widow). Edwardina's movements between the birth of her child and her second marriage in Rome in 1821 remain unknown though she presumably at some stage met Queen Caroline and was introduced by her to the man who became her second husband, John Turner Flinn.

 

Sir Eric de Normann doubted that Edwardina had actually married Flinn [de Normann (1978) 39] and knew nothing of their children [de Normann (1978) 35]. After Flinn was transported in 1840 Edwardina seems to have distanced herself from him, not writing to him for fourteen years [de Normann (1987) 42-43], apparently not telling her younger children of his existence, and allowing them to believe that they were the children of her first marriage. Flinn's photograph, however, survived amongst Edwardina's papers that eventually passed to Sir Eric [de Normann (1987) 41]; how that came about is not stated. Edwardina had herself gone to live at Naples in the 1840s and died there in 1875.

 

Edwardina's daughter, also called Edwardina, born about 1826, married in the surname de Normann in 1845, Lieut. Edward Middleton, U.S. Navy, but was divorced for adultery in 1850, she having returned to live with her mother at Naples. Flinn's eldest son, Edward Flinn, had followed his father to Australia by 1852, and was joined there by a younger brother Julius who had used the name de Normann. There may have been other children. The following account brings together for the first time what is known about Edwardina's two families:

 

Edwardina (Augusta) Kent, born 'about the beginning of 1798 found in Greenwich Parish', and baptised at Lewisham, Kent, 21 September 1800, 'Parents Unknown' [Lewisham Parish Registers]. Left England with Princess of Wales, August 1814; married 1stly at Brunswick (1814); claimed that first marriage was dissolved, 1820 [her letter of 12 December 1837 quoted in de Normann (1978) 29, saying June 1820 'confirmed by the Archives']; perhaps joined Queen Caroline at Rome, February-April 1820; married 2ndly at Rome (April 1821) and Camberwell, Surrey (1824); not named in will and codicils of Queen Caroline, 1821 proved 1822 [TNA PROB11/1653 folio 97]; her life policy, 1827, 'aged 28' [de Normann (1978) 14]; petitioned Queen Victoria for assistance, 14 July 1839 [de Normann (1978) 32]; wrote to Duchess of Kent as 'now left with five infant children', 16 December 1839 [de Normann (1978) 36]; second husband transported to Australia, May 1840; wrote to Lord Melbourne as having 'four destitute children', 3 September 1840 [de Normann (1978) 36]; of John Street, Lambeth, Surrey, aged 40, independent, born in Foreign Parts, 1841 [HO107/1060-4-8a, 'Flynn']; given £50 by Queen Victoria and £100 from Royal Bounty [de Normann (1978) 39-40]; lodged at 18 Alfred Street, Islington, giving lessons in languages and painting, 1842 [de Normann (1978) 40]; probably at Naples before January 1845 [marriage of daughter there]; at 32 Mergellina (Posilippo), Naples, 1849 [daughter's divorce papers]; wrote to second husband from Naples, 7 February 1854 [de Normann (1978) 42-43]; latterly had affair with Don Giacomo Arena, photographer, of Naples [de Normann (1978) 41]; of 32 Vico Dattero, Mergellina, Naples, 1866 [de Normann (1978) 43]. She died at Naples, 1875 [de Normann (1978) 14]. As 'Miss Edwardine Kent' she had married 1stly, 'by special order of the Duke [of Brunswick] at the Grauenhof without banns by Revd Berkhan of Lehre', at Chapter Church of St Blasius, Brunswick, 28 August 1814 (as his 1st wife), Johann Heinrich Ernst 'Gustav' von Normann (describing himself as 'Captain Edward Adolphus Gustavus von Normann') [de Normann (1978) 25], son of Johann Gustav von Normann by his wife Eleonora 'Henrietta' von Falkenhayn. He was born at Breslau, Silesia, 29 May 1790 [de Normann (1978) 20]. Educ. Warsaw; Cadet, Prussian Infantry Regiment, 1804; Ensign, 1805; Lieutenant, rifle battalion of Duke of Brunswick, 1809; wounded at Halberstadt; to England; Lieutenant in Duke of Brunswick's Regiment, 27 September 1809; Captain, 31 March 1814 [as 'de Normann', WO25/3007, quoted in de Normann (1978) 24; 1815 Army List as 'G. Norman']; served Peninsular War, 1810-14; Aide-de-Camp to Duke of Brunswick, February 1814; Major, 1 January 1815 (seniority from 8 December 1814); said to have inherited title of Freiherr [de Normann (1978) 31]; at Waterloo; half-pay, 1816; command of infantry battalion, 1822; commanded Duke's Guards and Lieutenant Colonel, 1828; Colonel, 1840; Major-General, 1841; Lieutenant General and GOC, Brunswick, 1851 [army career in de Normann (1978) 20-25, 31, 41-42]. He died at Brunswick, 26 January 1855; buried St Catherine's Cemetery, 28 January 1855 [de Normann (1978) 41-42]; obituary in Brunswick Magazine, 26 May 1855 [de Normann (1978) 41]. He had married 2ndly, 30 November 1824, Theresa von der Mulbe [de Normann (1978) 26, 31]. Edwardina and Gustav de Normann had issue:

 

1a.       John de Normann, born before or about May 1815 [de Normann (1978) 28]. Entered Neapolitan Navy as engineer, 1838 [de Normann (1978) 28]; chief mechanical engineer in charge of new electric telegraph at Naples, 1858 [de Normann (1978) 41]; his work laying cables mentioned in The Times, 1857 [1 September 1857, 8a; 17 November 1857, 8a; 26 December 1857, 7a]. He died 1912 [no W/A PPR 1911-15]. As Giovanni de Normann, of Marseilles, France, Bachelor, now residing at Paris, he had married at the British Embassy, Paris, 26 January 1856, Elizabeth 'Henrietta' Gummer, of Ramsgate, Kent, Spinster, now residing at Paris [Registers, RG33/74, No. 29]. She died at 1 Via Funaioli, Leghorn, Italy, 31 October 1907 [PPR Calendar]. Limited administration of her estate granted (to her husband's attorney), 30 January 1908 [PPR, £1,849-14-10]. They had issue:

           

1b.       Albert Edward de Normann, born at Naples, 1860. In shipping business at Marseilles and Genoa. He died at Genoa, February 1914 [no W/A PPR 1914-20]. He had married 1884, Irene Matilda Horatia Wood, daughter of Thomas Wood, H.B.M. Consul for Morea. She was born at Patras, Greece, 1856. She died at 24 Eastholm, Finchley, Middlesex, 17 January 1935 [PPR Calendar]. Her administration granted (to her son Eric), 21 February 1935 [PPR, £162]. They had issue:

 

1c.       Beatrice Nina Frederica de Normann, born at Marseilles, France, 12 August 1885. Theosophical educationist. She died (from 607 Hood House, Dolphin Square, London, S.W.1), 7 November 1974; cremated Catford Cemetery, 13 November 1974 [The Times, 9 November 1974, 30b]. Her will proved 28 May 1975 [PPR, £3,508]. She had married 1917, Robert Weld Ensor. He was born at Annaghmore, Armagh, Ireland, 1880. Captain of Police, Alberta, Canada; served (with Canadian forces) First World War; Archangel Expedition; emigrated to South Africa. He died at Lautewater, Uniondale, South Africa, 1933; buried Uniondale Church [no W/A PPR 1933-6]. They had issue.

 

2c.       Albert Wilfred Noel ('George') de Normann, born 1891. Surveyor-General of Nigeria. He died after a long illness at Cape Town, South Africa, 17 June 1957, aged 65 [The Times, 22 June 1957, 1a]. He had married Ruth Cleague.

 

3c.       Eric Norman de Normann, born 26 December 1893. Educ. Chateau du Rosey, Switzerland; University College of South Wales; served First World War, 1915-18; Office of Works, 1920; Imperial Defence College, 1935; administrator to mother, 1935; C.B. 1941; Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Works, 1943-54; K.B.E. 1946; chairman, Ancient Monuments Board for England, 1954-63; F.S.A.; author of Edwardina: the story of an unfortunate woman (Weybridge, 1978); of Aylesham, Old Avenue, St George's Hill, Weybridge KT12 0PY. He died at Aylesham, Weybridge, 25 January 1982, aged 88; funeral Randalls Park Crematorium, Leatherhead, Surrey, 29 January 1982 [The Times, 27 January 1982, 24a; obituary, The Times, 28 January 1982, 14f-g, 'of an ancient Jersey family']. His will proved 16 August 1982 [PPR, £135,665] [Who's Who; Kelly's Handbook]. He had married at St John's Wood, Middlesex, 18 August 1921, Winifred Scott, nee Leigh [The Times, 19 August 1946, 1a], daughter of I.L. Leigh, of Stockport. She died 1968. They had issue.

 

Mrs Edwardina de Normann married 2ndly, in Rome, Italy, April 1821, and again at St Giles, Camberwell, Surrey, 28 October 1824, John Turner Flinn, son of William and Sarah Flinn [Camp (2007) 209-10]. Sentenced to transportation for life, Central Criminal Court, 11 April 1840; transported to Australia, September 1840; witness to marriage of son Edward, 1852; granted free pardon, 10 December 1860; lived latterly with Registrar of Seamen, Melbourne [de Normann (1978) 42-43]. He died at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 17 May 1865 [de Normann (1978) 42-43], aged 85 [Death Certificate 4634, as 'Flynn', not seen]. They had (perhaps with other) issue:

 

2a.       Giovanni 'Edward' Turner Flinn, born 3 January 1822, and baptised at St Giles, Camberwell, Surrey, 3 January 1823. Ship's master (Australia), 1867-70; administrator to brother Julius, 1880. He died as 'Edward Augustus Flinn' at Hotham West, Victoria, Australia, 1901, aged 80 [Death Certificate, not seen; no W/A at PRO Victoria]. He had married as 'Edward Augustus Flinn' at St James Old Cathedral, Melbourne, Australia, 13 March 1852, Mary Ann Thompson [Marriage Certificate, No 5890, not seen]. No children of this marriage were registered in Victoria.

 

3a.       Edwardina ('Edda') Augusta Flinn, born in Italy [In the matter of the petition of Edward Middleton, as below, page 13], c.1826. With mother, aged 15, born in Foreign Parts, 1841. She went to U.S.A. with her husband, June 1845; left with her son for Europe, arrived Marseilles, 15 June 1849; lived with mother at Naples, 1849; divorced for adultery at Philadelphia (with Harry McCall a cousin of her husband) by the Legislature of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, January 1850 [following her husband's evidence In the matter of the petition of Edward Middleton (Harvard Law Library, Paper Book, 1850, 1034107) supported by a statement of Sidney G. Fisher (Harvard Law Library, 1004195)]. Subsequent history not found. As 'Edwardina de Normann' she had married at the British Chaplaincy, Naples, 13 January 1845 (as his 1st wife), Edward Middleton, U.S. Navy [FHL 574,492 from Guildhall Library MS 11,209], son of Hon. Henry Middleton (1770-1846), of Charleston, South Carolina, by his wife Mary Helen Hering. He was born at Charleston, South Carolina, 11 December 1810. Educated in Europe and U.S. Naval Academy, 1828; midshipman, 1834; Lieutenant, 1841; after marriage at Naples (1845) returned to U.S.A.; arrived at New York, 1 June 1845; lived at Charleston; joined U.S. Squadron in Gulf of Mexico, 9 December 1845; returned home, May 1846; joined U.S. Steamer Princeton, June 1847; served overseas until returned to U.S.A. in 1849 (wife and son had left for Europe two months earlier); served during U.S. Civil War; Captain, 1863; Commodore, 1868; Rear-Admiral, 1876. He died at Washington, D.C., 27 April 1883 [Colonial Families of the United States of America, iii (....) 331, not seen]. He had married 2ndly, Ellida J. Davidson. He had issue by his first wife an only child:

 

1b.       (male) Middleton, born at Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A., June 1846. Taken to Naples, Italy, by mother, June 1849; living, 3 January 1850 [father's Petition, 1850]. Subsequent history not found [called Edward, said to have been born at Naples, 6 June 1846, and to have died, 1847, in FamilySearch].

 

4a.       Julius Hamilton Flinn, born c.1831. With mother, aged 10, born in Foreign Parts, 1841; of Beaufort, Victoria, Australia, 1873 [de Normann (1978) 41]. He died, a miner, at Beaufort, Victoria, 27 November 1879, aged 48 [Death Certificate, No 9730, not seen]. His administration as Julius H. Flinn otherwise Julius de Normann granted (to his brother Edward Augustus Flinn), Victoria, 6 February 1880 [PRO Victoria, File 20/103]. As 'Julius Hamilton de Normann' he had married in Victoria, Australia, 1867, Emily Livinia Burguinn [Marriage Certificate, No 3132, not seen]. Perhaps the Emily de Norman who died in Victoria, Australia, 1884, aged 49 [Death Certificate, No 2714, not seen].

Page 216 Line 25, for 'Wood' read 'Hood'.

Pages 228-30 Mother of John Molloy. In my book I had dismissed the possibility of John Molloy being the child baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields on 8 October 1786 (son of William and Mary Molloy) because this William Molloy's connections were in a quite different social sphere from those of the ancestral John Molloy, William being a shoemaker in St Giles in the Fields and his friend, Thomas Loaring (named an executor in William's will in 1804, but not acting), also being a shoemaker. However, John is known to have been born on 5 September and if that was in 1786 then he may have purchased a commission with his inheritance when he became of age in 1807. William's personal estate was sworn 'under £2,000' which would certainly have been sufficient for such a purchase.

Proof that this is the correct entry, however, remains lacking. The widowed Mary Molloy married by licence of the Faculty Office dated 19 November 1806 at St James Piccadilly, Westminster, 1806 [entry not seen], one Merth Miler. Mary, wife of Merth Miler, of 16 High Street, Bloomsbury, shoemaker, and Thomas Loring [sic], together insured the property which they held in trust under the will of William Molloy (at 3 Tottenham Place, Tottenham Court Road, and 6 Little Earl Street, Seven Dials), with the Sun Fire Assurance Company, 24 February 1807 [Guildhall Library MS 11936/440/800420] and Merth Miler took out an insurance on 16 High Street, Bloomsbury with the same company on the same day [MS 11936/440/800419]. Merth Miller [sic] is described as of 14 High Street, Bloomsbury, boot & shoe maker, in Pigot's London Directory for 1825. I have not noted his or his wife's date of death/burial or will/administration. It is possible that John Molloy later distanced himself from his step-father and that his statement in 1851 that he was born at Harrow (where he was at school) was made with that intention.

Page 242 Line 22, for 179S read 1795.

Page 242 re George Nowell William Clarke

The Baptismal Register of St Mary the Boltons, West Brompton, Middlesex, shows that Robert Noel [sic] Clarke, son of George Noel & Emma Georgina Clarke, of 12 Gloucester Road, Old Brompton, Officer in the Army, was born 18 August 1853 and baptised there 8 February 1854 [Registers, Page 35, Entry 278].

Page 245 Line 52, for 'hater' read 'later'.

Page 246 Line 20, for 'first' read 'second'.

Page 246 Line 28, for 'second' read 'first'.

Page 263 Line 8, for '19S1' read '1951'.

Page 278 Prosper de Mestre.

On 12 September 2008 Mrs Maree Amor, a Mestre descendant, posted an article 'From France to Martinique' on her http://demestrefamilyhistory.blogspot.com that includes important discoveries about Prosper (de) Mestre. It reveals for the first time that he was born 15 August 1789 and baptised Jean Charles Prosper, 'fils naturel', of Heleine Coterel, at St Louis, Lorient, 17 August 1789 [Archives de la Ville de Lorient], no father being named. He had claimed that he was born in 1793 but the earlier date agrees with the fact that he was 'of full age' (and thus born before June 1790) when naturalized in America on 5 June 1811. [Prince Edward was, of course, at Geneva from December 1787 to January 1790].

His mother Heleine Thomase Coterel was born 15 July 1768 and baptised 16 July 1768 at St Etienne, Rennes [Archives Municipales de Rennes]. It seems likely that she met Andre Charles Mestre whilst he was on leave in 1788 but if she married him before her daughter Melanie was born that marriage has not been found. Melanie Caroline Jeanne Mestre was born 15 November 1790 and baptised 16 November 1790 at St Louis, Lorient. The entry indicates that the parents married at Rennes in 1788, but Mrs Amor has found no entry at Rennes or at Lorient.

Mrs Amor (in a fascinating article about the situation in Martinique) states that Andre Charles Mestre went to Martinique with the 2nd Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne in March 1791 under the new Governor-General, the Comte de Behague, a royalist, but that General Rochambeau, a republican, took over in February 1793 and promoted Andre Charles Mestre to be a Colonel of Artillery on 10 February 1793. He was killed on 14 March 1794 as Rochambeau's journal describes.

Page 285 - Elizabeth Kent and Constance Emilie Kent.

Constance Emilie Kent is the subject of Noeline Kyle, A greater guilt: Constance Emilie Kent & the Road Murder, 1860 (Brisbane, Australia, 2009; ISBN 9781921555343).

Page 289 - Brent Spencer

The illegitimate Brent Spencer was at 4 Princes Street, Chelsea, Middlesex, in 1841, aged 30, Ind, Yes, with Wilson Pelham, 15, Yes, and Harriet Pelham, 40, Ind, Yes [HO107/687-8-12r].

This younger Brent Spencer died at Worthing, Sussex, 20 August 1857 [PPR Calendar] and Administration of his estate as late of Munster House, Fulham, Middlesex, was granted 16 July 1858, to the Treasury Solicitor. Under £4,000 (resworn January 1860 under £7,000). His death appears to have been registered both at Worthing (September Quarter 1857, 2b 165) and at Liverpool (September Quarter 1857, 8b 27).

The above mentioned Wilson Pelham died at 8 Haward Street, Nine Elms, Surrey, 17 May 1864, a Servant of the South Western Railway Company, a Bachelor, and Administration of his effects (Under £450 in the United Kingdom) as Wilson Pelham alias Peneaud was granted at the Principal Registry, 31 December 1864, to Adam Rivers Steele, of 44 Bloomsbury Square, Middlesex, attorney-at-law & solicitor, a creditor of the deceased. He was buried at St George the Martyr, Battersea, Surrey, 21 May 1864, as of Hayward Street, Nine Elms, aged 42 [Registers Entry 622, Page 78].

The relationship between the Harriet Pelham, aged 40 in 1841, the Wilson Pelham alias Peneand, and the Harriet Peneand mentioned in the elder Brent Spencer's will, is unclear.

Page 322-4 - Albert, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

 

The paternity of Prince Albert is further discussed in Richard Sotnick, The Coburg conspiracy: royal plots and maneouvres [sic] (no place: Ephesus Publishing, 2008) but the chronology of Princess Louise's admirers therein seems unreliable and the author is apparently unaware of Hector Bolitho's essay 'The Prince Consort's mother' in his A biographer's notebook (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1950). Sotnick [page 176], for instance, says that Prince Ernst (Albert's father) complained in an (unquoted) letter to his brother Ferdinand about a 'liaison' between zu Solms and Louise (Albert's mother) in 1819, but it seems clear from Bolitho [page 115] that their flirtation did not take place until the midsummer of 1820 and had been forgotten by the time of her idyllic second wedding anniversary on 31 July 1820 [Bolitho, page 116] the circumstances of which are not mentioned by Sotnick. Although not important in this context, Princess Louise's description of von Munchausen's devotion to her is dated to March 1820 by Bolitho [page 117, seemingly a mistake for 1821]; Sotnick dates it to 1822 [page 134].

 

The main claim of Sotnick's book (apart from the suggestion that Prince Leopold may have been Prince Albert's father), however, is that Prince Albert was the son of one Friedrich Blum who appears as lacquais to Dowager Duchess Augusta at Schloss Ehrenburg in the annually printed Staats Kalender for 1818 and 1819 [Sotnick, page 177]. It is admitted that Friedrich Blum would not have been Jewish and the only evidence for the claim is a family tradition of descent from him amongst the descendants of one Jacob Blum, a Jewish boot maker, who was born about 1856 and migrated from Tukums, Latvia, to Mile End Old Town, about 1897-8. Family members believe that Friedrich had an affair with a princess whilst at Coburg and that a child Albrecht was born and accepted as a prince of the family [Sotnick, page 178], this belief being set out in an affidavit sworn by a descendant, Lawrence Bloom, in 2004. The affidavit is not quoted in full and the story lacks all credibility. Jacob Blum's son, Nathan, who was living in 1930, is said to have had a striking likeness to Prince Albert, but his published photograph [Sotnick, between pages 136 and 137] shows, to my mind, no resemblance whatever.

Pages 332-3 - Sarah ('Louisa') Fairbrother, Mrs FitzGeorge

Since the publication of the book two important discoveries have been made about Sarah ('Louisa') Fairbrother, known as Mrs FitzGeorge. Her baptism has at last been found and the father of her second child, Louisa Catherine, has been identified.

I am indebted to Mrs FitzGeorge's descendant Miss Diana FitzGeorge-Balfour for bringing to my attention a possible baptism for Sarah Fairbrother at St George, Hanover Square, in 1817, and further searches there have revealed the baptism of her sister Elizabeth Georgiana Fairbrother in 1813, proving that it is the correct entry. The entries in the Bishops Transcripts of the Parish Registers are as follows:

[No 681, Page 86] 1817 October 8 / Sarah / (daughter of) John & Mary Tucker / Fairbrother / James St. / Servant / (baptised by) J. Greville.

[No 537, no Page Number] 1813 [day and month not given] Elizth Georgiana / (daughter of) John & Mary / Fairbrother / Serv / James St / (baptised by) J. Greville.

It is now clear that the sisters were not twins as suggested in Williamson (1996) 153. The forename Tucker only appears in the name of the mother, Mary, at the one baptism and then when she died in 1847, but the details all fit well with the others published in my book.

It was long believed that Mrs FitzGeorge was a daughter of Robert Fairbrother (c.1768/9-1741) and in view of the interest in his family I have added a page to this website that sets out such details as I have of him and his children. I have added another page summarising the details of her life as we now know them.

Page 335 - Louisa Catherine FitzGeorge and Francis Fisher Hamilton

I am indebted to Mr Colin Burleigh the "3 times great nephew" of Francis Fisher Hamilton for bringing to my attention the latter's post-marriage settlement which he found in 1996 when looking for Hamilton entries in the Registry of Deeds in Henrietta Street, Dublin. This provides the name of Louisa Catherine's father.

The document, dated 1 August 1859 and registered 25 August 1859, is described as "an Indenture of Mortgage ... made between Thomas Bernard of Castle Bernard in the King's County Esquire Leiutenant Colonel in the King's County Militia of the first part, Francis Fisher Hamilton a Captain in her Majesty's 4th Regt of Foot and Louisa Katherine Bernard Hamilton his wife of the second part, and His Royal Highness George William Frederick Charles Duke of Cambridge and Richard Wellesley Bernard of Castle Bernard aforesaid Esquire trustees for the purposes thereinafter mentioned of the third part". It recites that prior to the marriage Thomas Bernard had agreed to provide a sum of  £1,000, secured by mortgage on his estates in King's County, the interest at 5% being for the use of Louisa Catherine Bernard Hamilton and her issue,  the mortgagees being the Duke of Cambridge and Thomas Bernard's brother Richard Wellesley Bernard.

Thomas Bernard was the eldest son of Colonel Thomas Bernard, M.P., of Castle Bernard, King's County, Ireland (died 18 May 1834), by his second wife Catherine Henrietta Hely-Hutchinson (died 1844), sister of John, 3rd Earl of Donoughmore [BLG sub Bernard of Bernard Castle]. He was born September 1816; educ. Winchester; Cornet, 12th Lancers, 24 April 1835; Lieutenant, 26 April 1839; Captain, 26 April 1844; Half Pay, 3 September 1847; Lieutenant Colonel, King's County Militia; J.P. and D.L. for King's County; High Sheriff, 1837; Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum of King's County; of Carlton Club (1860) and Castle Bernard, Kinnitty, King's County [Walford's County Families, 1860, 1882]; he died unmarried December 1882. Although educated at Winchester he does not appear amongst the 'Scholars' in T.F. Kirby, Winchester Scholars (London, 1888). There is no will or administration for him at the Principal Probate Registry, London, 1882-4, but there might be something at Dublin. His parents' wills were not proved in England either.

Miss Diana FitzGeorge-Balfour informs me that members of her family who knew Louisa Catherine were  always certain that she was not a daughter of the Duke.

Following the discovery of this settlement Mr Colin Burleigh has subsequently found the baptism of Louisa Catherine in the surname Bernard! She was born 22 March 1839 and baptised (by Revd. H. Palmer) at St James Westminster, 5 July 1839, the daughter of "Thomas & Louisa Bernard, of Golden Square, esquire" [Registers, Entry 359; FHL 1,042,311]. Her age as given in the 1841 census was thus correct. The birth does not appear to have been registered in either surname and the couple were certainly not married.

Page 338 - Mary Alice Olga Sofia Jane Lane

Miss Diana FitzGeorge-Balfour informs me that Mary Alice Olga Sofia Jane Lane was born 4 June 1919 [as in Willis (2002) 77] and not 4 January 1919 [as in CEDRE, Le royaume-uni de Grande Bretagne et Irlande du Nord, ii (1989) 168] and was named in the will of her grandfather (not great-uncle) Adolphus, 1920.

Pages 349-350 - Roderick Ross

Although the book shows that Roderick Ross was not a son of Edward VII, I was mystified by an illuminated scroll illustrated in the late Thomas W. Archibald's A History of the Lothian and Borders Police (1990) with the caption, 'A scroll given to the Chief Constable in 1907 by the Officers and Men of the City of Edinburgh Police on the decision of the Supreme Court denouncing the rumour that Roderick Ross was the illegitimate son of King Edward VII to be completely untrue and without foundation'. The scroll is dated 'New Year 1907' and offers 'respectful congratulations on the unanimous decision pronounced in your favour by the Supreme Court in the recent litigation in which you were defender - a decision which gave profound satisfaction throughout the whole Force'.

It seemed to me highly unlikely that such a testimonial would have been given to someone proving their legitimacy and that it related to something much more important to the Force. I have now found that late in 1906 the Chief Constable, Roderick Ross, and the Corporation of Edinburgh defended a case in which wrongful and malicious dismissal was alleged and £3,000 damages claimed. It is reported under the heading 'Ex-Dundee Policeman's Action' in the Dundee Courier for Friday, 21 December 1906, page 5, and was earlier mentioned in the same newspaper on 2 November 1906, page 4. This must be the litigation to which the scroll refers. I am indebted to James Mackie Boyd who drew the scroll to my attention and to David C. B. Conner for his assistance in the matter.

Page 349 - Edward VII (additional entry)

1858.      Mrs Edith Hemsted (died 1906). I am indebted to Professor Jane Ridley for the information that a recent History of Anacapri (1998), in a section taken from the notebooks of the historian Edwin Cerio (1875-1960) on the villa 'Il Rosajo', states that a former occupier, Mrs Edith Hemsted, 'a woman characterized by extraordinary culture, intelligence and taste', was 'the natural child of Edward VII of England'. Research, however, shows that Edith was born too early to have been the Prince's child and that she was the daughter of a London hair restorer.

She was Edith Laurence Taylor, born at St George's Middlesex, c. 1858-9 [1861, 1881Census] or Piccadilly, 1860-1 [1901 Census]; aged 2, with father, Andrew L. Taylor (aged 37, hair restorer), at Stafford Cottage, Stafford Terrace, St Mary Lambeth, 1861 [RG9/365-119-24]; aged 22, with mother, Jane Taylor (aged 61,widow, hair restorer), at 18 Spring Street, Paddington, 1881 [RG11/15-60-5];aged 41, 1901 [Census]. She died at Anacapri, Capri, 29 October 1906 [PPR Calendar]; her will proved London, 10 May 1907 [PPR, £34-9-11]. As of 18 Spring Street, aged 23, daughter of Andrew Laurence-Taylor, gentleman, she had married(signing 'Edith Lawrence Taylor') by licence at St James, Sussex Gardens, Paddington, 15 June 1881, Edward Hemsted, aged 39, widower, Major in the Army, of Aldershot, son of Stephen Hemsted, surgeon [Registers Entry 65, Page 33]. He was born in Newbury RD, Berkshire, June Quarter 1842 [GRO Birth Index; 1901 Census]; Lieutenant, 1862; Captain, 1871; Lt. Col., 1881 [Army Lists]; of 5 Granville Road, Have, Sussex, Retired Lt. Col. Infantry, 1901[RG13/935-121-26]. He died at Steventon, Berkshire, 13 April 1903, aged 61 [PPR Calendar; GRO Death Index]; his will as of The Old Manor House, Drayton, Berkshire, proved London 14 May 1903 [PPR, £1023-17-0]. Their only son was the pioneer sexologist Edward Charles Hemsted who was born at Anacapri, 1898, and died in London, 1961.

Page 349 - Edward VII (additional entry)

1861.       Mrs Green. In November 1864 the Prince was approached by a blackmailer named Green in connection with 'wickedness' into which the Prince had been 'ensnared' by Green's wife, apparently at Windsor, and 'above three years ago'. The couple were paid an annuity of £60 for their silence in 1861and obliged to emigrate to an unspecified place in New Zealand but the husband had returned to England and was making further demands by November 1864 [Ridley (2012) 58, 89-90]. The couple, whose forenames do not appear in the surviving records, have not been identified. She may be the unnamed woman who, according to rumours picked up by Lord Derby and noted 25 December 1861, had been introduced into the Castle at night [John Vincent, ed., Disraeli, Derby and the Conservative Party: Journals and Memoirs of Lord Stanley (Harvester Press, 1978) page 181].

1861.      Nellie Clifden (page 349). The Prince met Nellie Clifden at the Curragh on three occasions; the dates are provided by Jane Ridley from his diary as 6, 9 and 10 September [Ridley (2012) 54-55; 'N. C. 1st time', etc.].

1866.       Jeanne, Princess de Sagan (pages 350-1). Jane Ridley agrees that the Prince could not have been the father of the Princess de Sagan's son, Boson de Talleyrand-Perigord, born in Paris, 20 July 1867, as he did not leave England for St Petersburg (via Brussels and Potsdam) until 1 November 1866 [Ridley (2012) 171 footnote].

1867.       Lady Filmer (page 351). Jane Ridley remarks that a quoted letter from the Prince to Sir Edmund Filmer 'hardly suggests that Bertie was having a passionate affair with the wife' [Ridley (1212) 106].

1867-8.   Lady Forbes (page 352). Edward James's dictated memoir, sensationalised by George Melly in 1982, is rightly considered of little authority by Jane Ridley [email 26 January 2010]. Edward VII's letters to Edward James's mother, Evie (Mrs Willie James) nee Forbes, which Edward James never saw and which remained sealed until after Edward James's death in 1984, did not commence until after the King's first visit to West Dean Park in 1902, and there is no evidence that Evie, born in 1868, was the King's daughter, or indeed that Edward James himself, born in 1907, was the King's son. The coincidence of the date of the King's visit in November 1906 and Edward's birth in August 1907 may be striking, but Evie's future second husband John Brinton was also at the house party in November 1906 and is a much more likely candidate for paternity. Despite the statements in the memoir, it was accepted that Edward was not Willie James's son [Ridley (2012) 427 footnote].

1867-8.   Lady Mordaunt (page 354). Jane Ridley agrees with Queen Victoria that the Prince 'did not know more of, or admire, the unfortunate, crazy, Lady Mordaunt any more than he does or did other ladies' [Ridley (2012) 132]. I remain somewhat doubtful.

Page 362 - Edward VII (additional entry)

1867.      Madame de Didier. An 'exceedingly restless' Prince accompanied his invalid wife to the baths at Wiesbaden for two months, 18 August - 18 October1867, and there was much gossip about the attention he had paid to the ladies at St Petersburg and Moscow the previous November and at Paris in May, whilst Princess Alexandra was unwell [Magnus (1964) 94-95]. The Prince seems to have met at Wiesbaden one Madame Didier to whom, on his return to Windsor, he sent some Marius buttons, 12 November 1867, and whom he again met when in St Petersburg for the marriage of his brother Alfred in February 1874, later sending a photograph and his regret at not seeing her more often [Ridley (2012)110-11].

The lady, addressed as 'Comtesse' by the Prince, has not been identified with certainty. She may be the 'Madame St Didier', with Princess Sagan and Madame Erlanger, noted as amongst the ladies on horseback who followed the Prince when hunting in France in 1874 ['The Prince of Wales in France', in Daily News, Issue 8892, 24 October 1874]. Driven out of Russia by the Revolution and in abject poverty at Monte Carlo in 1921 Madame Didier, in an attempt to raise a little money, offered the Prince's three brief and discreet letters to King George V and was given £20 [Ridley (2012) 210].

1874.       Mrs Mary Cornwallis-West (page 362). A story in Tim Coates, Patsy (Bloomsbury, 2004; page 7) [repeated in Celia Lee, Winston & Jack(2007) 167-8], that, when sixteen, Mrs Cornwallis-West, had an affair with the Prince and that he fathered 'one, two or even three' of her children, is dismissed by Professor Jane Ridley who notes that the Prince was out of the country when the second child, George, was conceived [Ridley (2012) 167, 315; and note 70, pages 521-2].George was born at Ruthin, 14 November 1874, but the Prince had left England on10 January 1874 and did not return to Marlborough House from St Petersburg until 4 March [The Times, 6 March1874, 5e]. Professor Ridley provides a telling story of the Prince not recognising George at a later house party [Ridley (2012) 315].

William Cornwallis West had married Mary ('Patsy') Fitzpatrick at Dublin, 3 October1872, and their first child, Mary Theresa Olivia ('Daisy'), was born at Ruthin,28 June 1873. The third and last child, Constance Edwina ('Shelagh'), was born at Ruthin, September Quarter 1876. Mary, aged 7, and George, aged 6, were with William's sister, Georgiana Peacocke, at West Street, Southwick, Hampshire, in1881 [RG11/1169-3810] whilst Constance, aged 4, was with her parents at The Hermitage, Old Windsor, Berkshire [RG11/1325-88-30]. In 1891 the parents and their three teen-age children, with other relatives, were at Newlands Manor, Milford, Hampshire [RG12/900-26-7]. There does not appear to be the slightest contemporary evidence that one or more of the children was not William's though later scandal frequently made George the Prince's son.

1875.       Mrs Mabel Batten (page 363). Jane Ridley, whilst recognising their later friendship, considers the Prince's relationship with Mabel Batten in India 'probably no more than a flirtation' [Ridley (2012) 180].

1875.       Lady Aylesford (page 363). The Prince's three joking and flirtatious letters to 'My dear Lady Joe' (Lady Aylesford) are published for the first time by Jane Ridley [Ridley (2012) 191-2]. She considers Randolph Churchill's claim that they were dynamite that could rock the monarchy 'laughable'.

Page 363 - Edward VII (additional entry)

1875-6.   Jesusa de Murrieta(c.1834-1898). In April 1875 the Prince (preparing to go to India) went to Mentone for Easter and Lord Derby heard a rumour that he had gone with Mrs Murrieta, 'abundantly notorious in London' (the description is that of Lord Derby). Mrs Murrieta, the wife of a wealthy Spanish merchant who entertained lavishly at houses in Kensington Place and at Wadhurst in Sussex [Ridley (2012) 172]. On the way back from India in April 1876, he spent three days sightseeing with her in Seville, having (Lord Derby was informed) taken lodgings under an assumed name[Ridley (2012) 195]. The extent of the Prince's relationship with Mrs Murrieta, a friend of Jennie Jerome, is uncertain; it was also rumoured that she had created a Wadhurst love-nest for him and Lillie Langtry [Ridley (2012) 211-12].

She was Jesusa, daughter of Vicente Bellido. She died in St George Hanover Square RD, March Quarter 1898, aged 54. She had married at the Chateau de Bel Air, near Bordeaux, 28 May 1863, Don Jose Murrieta del Campo Mello y Urrutia. He was born in Marylebone, 25 October 1833; created Marques of Santurce, by Alfonso XII of Spain, 4 June 1877; had Royal Licence to assume and use title, 1 October1877; and died in Uxbridge RD, September Quarter 1915, aged 81 [Ruvigny (1910)351; GRO Death Indexes]. The Prince and Princess of Wales attended the marriages of their two daughters at Brompton Oratory in 1889 and 1891. After financial setbacks the family sold the Wadhurst estate in 1898.

1877.       Lillie Langtry and The Red House (page 364). I had accepted statements [Brough (1975) 166-8; Beatty (1999) 87-9] that the Red House, Knyveton Road, Bournemouth was built by the Prince for Lillie Langtry in 1877, but Jane Ridley noted that there is no contemporary evidence that the Prince had any connection with the house or ever went or stayed there [Ridley (2012) 206]. Many of the stories about Lillie Langtry's affair with the Prince and their various 'love-nests' are clearly much exaggerated.

Without cited contemporary evidence this story of the involvement of the Prince of Wales with Lillie Langtry at The Red House (now called Langtry Manor) at the junction of Knyveton Road and Derby Road in Bournemouth is highly suspect. According to the article on the women's club founder and temperance campaigner Emily Langton Massingberd (1847-1897) in Wikipedia, "after marriage [to her second cousin Edmund Langton] in 1867 their home was the Red House in Knyveton Road, Bournemouth". Emily's article in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says that the couple, 'lived principally at Bournemouth: Emily Langton built the Red House in Knyveton Road, and gave entertainment to the workmen employed on the villa'. The first two of their four children, Charlotte and Stephen, were, in fact, born at Tisbury and Barnack [RG10/1178-31-53], but their daughters Mary (born in 1871) and Diana (born in 1873) were born at Bournemouth [RG11/22-102-41], perhaps at The Red House [their birth and baptismal entries have not been found]. The husband, Edmund Langton, died at Eastwood, East Cliffe Road, Bournemouth (the home of his father Revd Charles Langton) on 28 November 1875, aged 34 [PPR Calendar; RG11/1194-120-14]. In January 1881 Edmund's young widow, Emily Langton Langton, held a fancy dress dance 'at the Assembly Room of the Red House, Bournemouth' [Hampshire Telegraph,15 January 1881, page 3] but by the time of the census that year (3 April) she was at 23 Sussex Place, Kensington [RG11/22-102-41] whilst the Red House was occupied by John E. Cooke and his family [RG11/1194-32-55]. He may only have rented for a while, as according to Elizabeth Crawford, The women's suffrage movement in Britain and Ireland: a regional survey (2013), Laura Ormiston Chant and Caroline Biggs 'held a drawing-room meeting at the home of Mrs Langton (The Red House, Derby Road)' on 15 December 1883. According to James Brough [The Prince & the Lily (1975) page 282] Lillie Langtry, when settling affairs in England, is said to have gone to Bournemouth in 1883 'where the town records registered the new occupants of the Red House as "Mrs E. L. Langton and family"' but it is clear that Emily Langton had lived there for some years and he gives no reference or date.

It seems highly likely that the above Mrs Emily L. Langton, a prosperous widow of about Lillie's age, who died in 1897, was at some later date confused in people's memories with the notorious Lillie (Mrs Emilie L. Langtry). Such confusion would have been strengthened by noting the Red House's beam with its inscription 'E.L.L.' and its seeming coincidence with events in Lillie Langtry's life. However, as Laura Beatty has already pointed out the entire story is based merely on local verbal traditions and by 1877, when the Red House is said to have been built, Lillie had dropped the name Emilie [Beatty (1999) 89]. The initials almost certainly relate to Emily Langton Langton and the story might well be clarified by further research locally [AJC July-August 2013].

Page 368 - Edward VII (additional entry)

1881-5.   Consuelo, Viscountess Mandeville(1858-1909). According to Henry Vane's Affair of State: a biography of the 8th Duke and Duchess of Devonshire(2004, page 186), Consuelo, Viscountess Mandeville was the Prince's mistress in the mid-1880s, 'filling a niche between Lillie Langtry and Daisy Brooke', the latter being credited with sweeping out 'the American gang' that would have included Consuelo. However, there does not seem to be any confirmatory evidence of the rumoured relationship though she and her sisters were often at Marlborough House and the Prince is said to have been 'crazy about her Spanish songs' which she accompanied on the banjo. Her husband was made bankrupt in 1889 and she was ostracised for her part in the Lady Brooke controversy that year, remaining out of favour until 1905 [Ridley(1012) 233, 268, 404]. She was the model for the main character, 'Conchita Closson', in Edith Wharton's The Buccaneers (1938) [Ridley (2012) 233-4].

She was Consuelo, daughter of Antonio Yznaga del Valle, of Ravenswood, Louisiana, and New York, and Cuba. She was born in Louisiana, USA, 1858, and died at 5 Grosvenor Square, London, 20 November 1909. She had married at New York, 22 May 1876, George (Montagu), 11th Viscount Mandeville, who succeeded as 8th Duke of Manchester, 1890, and died at Tanderagee Castle, Armagh, 18 August 1892, aged39 [CP viii (1932) 378-9].

1889-97. Daisy, Countess of Warwick (page 372). Jane Ridley [quoting Sushila Anand, Daisy: the life and loves of the Countess of Warwick (2009) page 81] says that Daisy was in no doubt that Joe Laycock was the father of her child, Maynard Greville.

Page 373 -Edward VII (additional entry)

1897.       Mrs Emma Bourke(died 1935). Emma Bourke, the eldest sister of Mabel Batten and with a husband 20 years older than herself, was a regular companion of the Prince on his afternoon drives when at the Hotel Weimar, Marienbad, in August 1897. She is described as manipulative by Jane Ridley and had a history of allegedly sending poison pen letters. Her husband, a stockbroker, was often short of money. A letter from the Prince, dated 19 September 1897, hints at a physical relationship [Ridley (2012) 327]. She and her husband dined with the Prince at Nice in the spring of 1898 and on 3 July 1899 the Prince described her as 'the kindest and best little woman in the world', sending her £100 from his winnings at Ascot and Newmarket [Ridley (2012) 327]. Their friendship continued after the Prince became King, he showering her with notes addressed 'Ma Chere Amie, 'My dearest little friend' and, more, frequently 'My Dear Mrs Bourke' [Ridley (2012) 353].

She was Emma Mary Augusta (died 9 March 1935), eldest daughter of Lieut.-Gen. George Cliffe Hatch, C.S.I. She had married 1stly, 20 November 1872, Edward Roden Bourke, 6th son of Robert (Bourke), 5th Earl of Mayo, by whom she had five children. He was born 13 December 1835; Major 3rd Hussars, Military Secretary to Governor-General of India, 1869-72; died 7 June 1907. She married 2ndly, 5 August 1908, Edward (Hyde), 5th Earl of Clarendon; Lord Chamberlain,1900-05. He died 2 October 1914.

1897.       Agnes Keyser (page 373). Jane Ridley notes from the Prince's diary that he first dined with Agnes Keyser on 8 October 1895 and not in February 1898 as generally stated [Ridley (2012) 338 note 107].

1907.       Evelyn Elizabeth Forbes (Page 377). See above re page 352.

Page 367 - Widow Signoret

Presumably the Fanny Signoret named in the anonymous Things I shouldn't tell (London: Eveleigh Nash & Grayson,1924) page 16 (as a friend of Harry Milbank, the young Duc de Morny and Lord Dupplin), and, with Esther Guimond (died 1879) as 'des morphinomanes' at Montmartre, in Jean Lorrain, Heures d'Afrique: chroniques du Maghreb 1893-1898 (Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994).

Page 374 Line 28, for 'Sofia' read 'Sonia'.


Page 387 - Mrs Mary Jane Haddon

The birth of a second child to Mrs Haddon and George Edward Rogers is mentioned in C.G. Gordon Haddon, My uncle, King George V (New York: Harhill Press, 1929), page 23, where he writes, "Toward the end of 1892 my mother had another child. Whether the Duke or Rogers was its father I never found out, and in any case the baby girl did not live long enough for any one to be concerned about it. She died before her first birthday."

According to Mrs Haddon's first husband's divorce petition this child was born in August 1891, but the birth has not been identified in the indexes at the General Register Office. She may be the Mary Haddon, aged 0, whose death was registered in the March Quarter of 1892 [1a 305] for whom there does not appear to be a corresponding birth entry. The book [pages 26-27] says that Rogers left her about the end of 1894 or 1895 and "his people sent him to South Africa" where he died "partly of starvation, but mostly of drink".

The book mentions Mrs Haddon's later marriage in the surname Lambert to Robert William Kingdom in 1900 (the spelling Kingdon is apparently a mistake) [pages 46-7] adding that he left her and returned to England [page 48], and her subsequent  bigamous marriage to Henry Gorbold, a merchant in Calcutta, in 1909 [page 156]. Guy Gordon Haddon last saw his mother in March 1909 [page 156] and later made various enquiries about her death [page 158] but no trace could be found.

Page 388 - (Clarence) Guy Gordon Haddon

The extraordinary life of the unstable Guy Gordon Haddon is set out in the above mentioned book. He had clearly been led to believe that he was the son of the Duke (though he was born in India before the Duke's visit) and he harboured a life-long grudge that he had not benefited from his mother's brief connection. He was not always truthful and he makes no mention of his marriage.

He claimed to have been born at Park Street, Fulham [page 22; called Parke Street on page 97], on 28 September 1890 [page 13]; he went to India with his mother, 1894/5 [pages 26-27]; they lived at Bombay [30], Calcutta [34]. Rangoon [40] and Ceylon [42]; returned to Bombay at the end of 1897 for almost a year [44]; went to Madras at the end of 1898 [46]; his mother married, 1900, and he was sent to Melbourne, Australia; was apparently cared for by the Salvation Army at a farm at Bayswater, Victoria [50]; went to school c.1901 at Fern Tree Gally; was with mother (she had been in England looking for Kingdom) at Melbourne, January 1903 [52]; they returned to Calcutta, mid-1903 [55]; he joined the 15th Kings Hussars as a band boy as Guy Gordon Kingdom, and served in India [58] until mid-1906 [115]; went to Singapore, 1906 [133]; apprentice as marine engineer, Tanjong Pagar docks, Singapore, August-September 1906 [137]; joined China Imperial Maritime Customs, after November 1906 [144] to 1 July 1909 [155] when he resigned and joined the Hong Kong police [160]; was for several months a warder at Shangai prison [161]; he joined the customs at Canton, but resigned after 2 weeks [162]; went to Sumatra to work on plantation at Medan, end 1909 [170]; went to Calcutta, end 1910 [174]; took ship to England, but got off at Chile [175]; about a year bay assistant with Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Valparaiso [174]; left them 19 December 1912 [176]; joined company at Taltal as engineer [176]; resigned 4 January 1914 [178]; joined Chile Exloration Company at Chuquicamata; came to England on outbreak of War, enlisted as gunner 17th Reserve Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 21 September 1914 [180]; 2nd Lieutenant, Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, 2 April 1915 [183]; joined Tenth Reserve Battalion at Litchfield, 12 May 1915; served on Somme [184]; transferred to 289th Company, Royal Engineers, 1 July 1917 [184]; demobilised, July 1919 [185]; joined British Central Africa Company Ltd in Nyasaland [188]; to South Africa, December 1919 [192]; joined Irrigation Department of South Africa in Johannesburg, to September 1920 [193]; had other jobs in South Africa [193]; returned to England, early 1921 [194]; Clerk of Works with Imperial War Graves Commission, Macedonia, 29 August 1921 [195] to 6 March 1924 [206]; appealed to George V for assistance [208]; was few weeks temporary clerk at Somerset House [212]; sailed on S.S. Macedonia for Shanghai, 7 November 1924 [212] had applied for post with HBM's Office of Works in China; worked in Canton, etc., to 31 December 1926 [228] as engineer in Consular Service; joined Messrs Palmer & Turner, Shanghai, architects, surveyors, civil engineers, 1 January 1927, supervising building and construction [235]; was described in letter from Major General Duncan, North China Command, as "Mr. C.G. Haddon, M.C." [239]; left Shanghai for Singapore, 3 January 1928 [243], employed by Gammon (Malaya) Ltd, concrete engineers, at Kuala Lumpor, until end May [244; joined Fogden, Brisbane & Co, engineers and contractors, Singapore; in Perak, July 1928 [248] appealed to George V for assistance; sailed to England, September 1928 [245]; unemployed; went to Holland, 10 February 1929 [247]. His book was published at New York later that year, but (as detailed in my book) he had returned to England by January 1934.

Page 399 - Count Galeazzo Ciano.

In view of the comments about Wallis Spencer's supposed relationship whilst at Shanghai between March and August 1925 with Count Ciano, I was interested to see in Ray Moseley's Mussolini's shadow; the double life of Count Galeazzo Ciano (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 1999) the comment [pages 9-10] that the story of her affair and subsequent abortion was widely believed and frequently published in Italy, but that, 'While Ciano did know her, and he and [his wife] Edda once received a present from her, this story has never been substantiated and Edda later insisted to friends, presumably on the word of her husband, that it was untrue'. Count Ciano was, of course, highly promiscuous and did not marry Edda Mussolini (1910-1995) - not the most reliable of witnesses - until 1930. He graduated in 1925 and his visit to Shanghai that year is not mentioned by Ray Moseley. The latter's comment about Wallis is noted in the discussion of Ciano's time at Peking between May 1927 and August 1929, long after Wallis had returned to America.


Anthony J. Camp, amended 2008, June, July, August 4, 15, October 12, November 13, 23, December 29, 30, 15 February 2009; 20 April 2009; 25 May 2009; 28 September 2009; 15 March 2010; 31 May 2010; 9 June 2010; 29 July 2010; 19 December 2010; 3 March 2011; 2 January 2012; 29 July 2012; 2 August 2012; 10 November 2012; 18 November 2012; 26 December 2012; 8 April 2013; 22 July 2013; 9re The Red House) 25 July 2013; 30 December 2013.